Research Topic

Biosynthetic Properties of Lactic Acid Bacteria and their Role in Food Fermentations, Food-safety, and Therapy: A focus on Antimicrobials and Vitamins

About this Research Topic

Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have GRAS (generally regarded as safe) status, and are used as potential starter cultures and probiotics in fermented foods. Research on production of functional metabolites, such as vitamins and antimicrobial compounds are important in the bio-enrichment of food. The therapeutic properties of LAB are gaining interest. Novel, advanced fermentation and production methods are being developed and the delivery of antimicrobial compounds to areas of infection are discovered. Research on LAB is clearly shifting towards many other applications besides food fermentation and preservation as strains with unique properties are discovered. The discovery of novel molecules, enzymes and antimicrobials through genome mining, followed by in vitro production, produced many promising results and will continue to do so as technology improves. Nano-technology is playing a key role in the developing of cell-factories, nano-formulations, nano-dressings, etc. All of these discoveries requires a firm understanding of cellular interactions.

The first problem (pertaining to food-safety and vitamin-biofortification) would be tackled by in situ exploitation of secretory LAB with antimicrobial- and vitamin-producing phenotypes, respectively. The second question (referred to as prevention or cure of vitamin deficiencies) would be assessed with in vitro (cell culture studies). The third query (related to prophylactic or therapeutic roles of antimicrobials) would be resolved either through abundant delivery of secretory live-cells to host surfaces, or via nano-delivery to targeted site-of-action (cell-culture in vitro and animal studies in vivo).

In summary, we invite manuscripts (reviews as well as original research submissions) on,
• In situ bioproduction of LAB antimicrobials for safety and extended shelf life of foods.
• In situ vitamin biofortification/ bioenrichment of deficient food-bases through fermentation by vitamin-producing LAB.
• LAB vesicles and other novel metabolites which are beneficial for food safety or nutrition reinforcement.
• In vitro (cell culture) bioproduction of vitamins by secretory LAB for possible prevention or reversion of respective deficiencies (clinical or subclinical).
• In vivo production of LAB antimicrobials for possible prophylactic or therapeutic effects against bacterial infections of multidrug resistance nature.
• Nano-technological approaches for the delivery of antimicrobials. Including (1) Preparation and characterization of antimicrobial-containing wound/ surgical nano-dressings and (2) Nano-formulations for the alleviation of multi-drug resistant bacterial infections.
• Novel approaches to protect and deliver active antimicrobials at targeted site, and to enhance activity

Please note that Frontiers in Microbiotechnology will not accept studies on animals and any manuscripts including testing on animals should be submitted to another relevant section.


Keywords: antimicrobials, vitamins, targeted delivery, lactic acid bacteria, host


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have GRAS (generally regarded as safe) status, and are used as potential starter cultures and probiotics in fermented foods. Research on production of functional metabolites, such as vitamins and antimicrobial compounds are important in the bio-enrichment of food. The therapeutic properties of LAB are gaining interest. Novel, advanced fermentation and production methods are being developed and the delivery of antimicrobial compounds to areas of infection are discovered. Research on LAB is clearly shifting towards many other applications besides food fermentation and preservation as strains with unique properties are discovered. The discovery of novel molecules, enzymes and antimicrobials through genome mining, followed by in vitro production, produced many promising results and will continue to do so as technology improves. Nano-technology is playing a key role in the developing of cell-factories, nano-formulations, nano-dressings, etc. All of these discoveries requires a firm understanding of cellular interactions.

The first problem (pertaining to food-safety and vitamin-biofortification) would be tackled by in situ exploitation of secretory LAB with antimicrobial- and vitamin-producing phenotypes, respectively. The second question (referred to as prevention or cure of vitamin deficiencies) would be assessed with in vitro (cell culture studies). The third query (related to prophylactic or therapeutic roles of antimicrobials) would be resolved either through abundant delivery of secretory live-cells to host surfaces, or via nano-delivery to targeted site-of-action (cell-culture in vitro and animal studies in vivo).

In summary, we invite manuscripts (reviews as well as original research submissions) on,
• In situ bioproduction of LAB antimicrobials for safety and extended shelf life of foods.
• In situ vitamin biofortification/ bioenrichment of deficient food-bases through fermentation by vitamin-producing LAB.
• LAB vesicles and other novel metabolites which are beneficial for food safety or nutrition reinforcement.
• In vitro (cell culture) bioproduction of vitamins by secretory LAB for possible prevention or reversion of respective deficiencies (clinical or subclinical).
• In vivo production of LAB antimicrobials for possible prophylactic or therapeutic effects against bacterial infections of multidrug resistance nature.
• Nano-technological approaches for the delivery of antimicrobials. Including (1) Preparation and characterization of antimicrobial-containing wound/ surgical nano-dressings and (2) Nano-formulations for the alleviation of multi-drug resistant bacterial infections.
• Novel approaches to protect and deliver active antimicrobials at targeted site, and to enhance activity

Please note that Frontiers in Microbiotechnology will not accept studies on animals and any manuscripts including testing on animals should be submitted to another relevant section.


Keywords: antimicrobials, vitamins, targeted delivery, lactic acid bacteria, host


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

12 October 2020 Abstract
09 February 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

12 October 2020 Abstract
09 February 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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