Research Topic

Breakthroughs in the Genetics of Male Infertility

About this Research Topic

The incidence of human infertility is about 15-20%, of which male factors account for approximately 50%. Genetic aberrations are important causal factors in male infertility, including Klinefelter Syndrome (47, XXY), chromosomal translocations, inversions, AZF region deletion on the Y chromosome, copy number variations, and single nucleotide variants. In recent years, with the development of high-throughput sequencing technology, researchers have found more and more novel genes and mutations that cause male infertility. For example, in the field of male asthenozoospermia, researchers around the world have identified more than 20 new genes related to multiple morphological abnormalities of sperm flagella (MMAF).

Although the field of male infertility genetics has developed rapidly in recent years, many studies have found that male infertility is genetically heterogeneous; that is, the pathogenic genes of different patients might be different. Therefore, the discovery of novel disease-causing genes and mutations can not only enrich researchers' understanding of the etiology of the disease, but also lay the foundation for future clinical genetic consultations for patients. The goal of this Research Topic is to provide a platform for researchers to share the latest breakthroughs in the genetics of male infertility to their colleagues around the world.

The following contributions (Original Research, Reviews) are welcomed, but not limited to:
a) genetics studies on non-obstructive azoospermia and oligozoospermia.
b) genetics studies on asthenozoospermia, especially multiple morphological abnormalities of the sperm flagella (MMAF).
c) genetic studies on teratozoospermia, especially the acephalic spermatozoa syndrome and globozoospermia.


Keywords: male infertility, genetics, azoospermia, asthenozoospermia, acephalic spermatozoa


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The incidence of human infertility is about 15-20%, of which male factors account for approximately 50%. Genetic aberrations are important causal factors in male infertility, including Klinefelter Syndrome (47, XXY), chromosomal translocations, inversions, AZF region deletion on the Y chromosome, copy number variations, and single nucleotide variants. In recent years, with the development of high-throughput sequencing technology, researchers have found more and more novel genes and mutations that cause male infertility. For example, in the field of male asthenozoospermia, researchers around the world have identified more than 20 new genes related to multiple morphological abnormalities of sperm flagella (MMAF).

Although the field of male infertility genetics has developed rapidly in recent years, many studies have found that male infertility is genetically heterogeneous; that is, the pathogenic genes of different patients might be different. Therefore, the discovery of novel disease-causing genes and mutations can not only enrich researchers' understanding of the etiology of the disease, but also lay the foundation for future clinical genetic consultations for patients. The goal of this Research Topic is to provide a platform for researchers to share the latest breakthroughs in the genetics of male infertility to their colleagues around the world.

The following contributions (Original Research, Reviews) are welcomed, but not limited to:
a) genetics studies on non-obstructive azoospermia and oligozoospermia.
b) genetics studies on asthenozoospermia, especially multiple morphological abnormalities of the sperm flagella (MMAF).
c) genetic studies on teratozoospermia, especially the acephalic spermatozoa syndrome and globozoospermia.


Keywords: male infertility, genetics, azoospermia, asthenozoospermia, acephalic spermatozoa


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

10 March 2021 Manuscript
21 June 2021 Manuscript Extension

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

10 March 2021 Manuscript
21 June 2021 Manuscript Extension

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..