Research Topic

Beyond Bariatric Surgery: Expected and Unexpected Long-Term Evolution

About this Research Topic

In line with the increasing prevalence of obesity, demand for the surgical treatment of obesity is similarly increasing. The compound annual growth rate (CAGR) for bariatric surgery [i.e., ‘weight loss surgery’ (BS)] is estimated to grow at a rate of 10% between 2019 and 2024.

BS is the most effective method available today in terms of rate of excess weight loss in both absolute and relative values. Its positive impact on different cardiometabolic parameters (such as one related to Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus) has been repeatedly demonstrated and evidenced in the literature. However, it is still debated whether these positive impacts are attributable to the surgical procedure itself or the resultant weight loss.

In addition, fewer publications have been devoted to the effect of BS on the occurrence and magnitude of weight regain in the long-term following surgery, as well as on the long-term complications from somatic and psychological points of view.

To address this, the present Research Topic aims to explore the expected and unexpected long-term evolution of the following:
• Changes in body weight and body composition (including weight regain and lean body mass loss during slimming immediately post-surgery and in the long term (i.e., 10 years and later) and in the longer term.
• Obesity-related cardiometabolic complications (including remission rate of type 2 diabetes, arterial hypertension, stroke, and obstructive sleep apnea)
• Polycystic ovary syndrome
• Renal function and prevalence of nephrolithiasis

We also interested in review and original articles putting in evidence the
• Surgery-related intervention complications, re-operation and revision rate
• The psychological impact of rapid weight loss on patient perception of body shape and body image.
• Psychological comorbidities pre- and post-surgery and relapse rates (e.g., depression, anxiety, substance abuse). We invite original research and review articles addressing the optimal pathway of patients with obesity before and after BS in order to better understand the trajectory of these identified obesity-related complications and co-morbidities.


Keywords: Obesity, Bariatric Surgery, Cardiometabolic Outcomes, Psychological Co-Morbidity


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

In line with the increasing prevalence of obesity, demand for the surgical treatment of obesity is similarly increasing. The compound annual growth rate (CAGR) for bariatric surgery [i.e., ‘weight loss surgery’ (BS)] is estimated to grow at a rate of 10% between 2019 and 2024.

BS is the most effective method available today in terms of rate of excess weight loss in both absolute and relative values. Its positive impact on different cardiometabolic parameters (such as one related to Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus) has been repeatedly demonstrated and evidenced in the literature. However, it is still debated whether these positive impacts are attributable to the surgical procedure itself or the resultant weight loss.

In addition, fewer publications have been devoted to the effect of BS on the occurrence and magnitude of weight regain in the long-term following surgery, as well as on the long-term complications from somatic and psychological points of view.

To address this, the present Research Topic aims to explore the expected and unexpected long-term evolution of the following:
• Changes in body weight and body composition (including weight regain and lean body mass loss during slimming immediately post-surgery and in the long term (i.e., 10 years and later) and in the longer term.
• Obesity-related cardiometabolic complications (including remission rate of type 2 diabetes, arterial hypertension, stroke, and obstructive sleep apnea)
• Polycystic ovary syndrome
• Renal function and prevalence of nephrolithiasis

We also interested in review and original articles putting in evidence the
• Surgery-related intervention complications, re-operation and revision rate
• The psychological impact of rapid weight loss on patient perception of body shape and body image.
• Psychological comorbidities pre- and post-surgery and relapse rates (e.g., depression, anxiety, substance abuse). We invite original research and review articles addressing the optimal pathway of patients with obesity before and after BS in order to better understand the trajectory of these identified obesity-related complications and co-morbidities.


Keywords: Obesity, Bariatric Surgery, Cardiometabolic Outcomes, Psychological Co-Morbidity


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

10 November 2020 Abstract
10 March 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

10 November 2020 Abstract
10 March 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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