Research Topic

Perception and Neuroscience in Extended Reality (XR)

About this Research Topic

Extended reality (XR) technologies are powerful tools for researching perception and behavior. XR enables us to study perception and its underlying theoretical mechanisms in ways that might not otherwise be possible, enabling us to generate highly controllable stimuli, situate these stimuli in ecologically valid settings, and capture data regarding participants' behavior that is both objective and rich. However, it is also critical to understand how these technologies generally affect the way people perceive virtual spaces, objects, and events. Do virtual spaces seem as large as real spaces? Do people treat virtual objects or entities as they do their real equivalents? Are actions in virtual environments similar to those in the real world? Can we learn about the real world through virtual environments? Can XR be used to evaluate or extend existing theories of perception?

Research on both the perception of virtual environments as well as the use of virtual environments to test perceptual theories, can broaden our understanding of how to best design these environments for a variety of applications. Comparisons of perception of virtual and real environments, as well as objective measures of perception (including the use of neuroscience methodologies to assess perception) are needed and highly relevant to understanding the neural and behavioral bases of perception. We invite submissions of original research that employ XR technology to investigate issues relating to perception, with a particular interest in spatial perception and objective measures.

The theme of this special issue focuses on the use of extended reality (VR/AR/MR) to understand the neural and behavioral bases of perception. Specific related topics involving XR could include the following:

- Objective or subjective measures of visual, haptic, or auditory perception
- Neuroscience methodologies used to understand perception
- Investigations of perception using psychophysical, behavioral, or physiological measures
- The use of XR to examine perceptual illusions
- Testing changes in sensory perception over extended periods of immersion
- Comparisons of perception in XR to the real world using behavioral or physiological measures


Keywords: Perception, Neuroscience, Psychophysics, Objective Measures, Vision


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Extended reality (XR) technologies are powerful tools for researching perception and behavior. XR enables us to study perception and its underlying theoretical mechanisms in ways that might not otherwise be possible, enabling us to generate highly controllable stimuli, situate these stimuli in ecologically valid settings, and capture data regarding participants' behavior that is both objective and rich. However, it is also critical to understand how these technologies generally affect the way people perceive virtual spaces, objects, and events. Do virtual spaces seem as large as real spaces? Do people treat virtual objects or entities as they do their real equivalents? Are actions in virtual environments similar to those in the real world? Can we learn about the real world through virtual environments? Can XR be used to evaluate or extend existing theories of perception?

Research on both the perception of virtual environments as well as the use of virtual environments to test perceptual theories, can broaden our understanding of how to best design these environments for a variety of applications. Comparisons of perception of virtual and real environments, as well as objective measures of perception (including the use of neuroscience methodologies to assess perception) are needed and highly relevant to understanding the neural and behavioral bases of perception. We invite submissions of original research that employ XR technology to investigate issues relating to perception, with a particular interest in spatial perception and objective measures.

The theme of this special issue focuses on the use of extended reality (VR/AR/MR) to understand the neural and behavioral bases of perception. Specific related topics involving XR could include the following:

- Objective or subjective measures of visual, haptic, or auditory perception
- Neuroscience methodologies used to understand perception
- Investigations of perception using psychophysical, behavioral, or physiological measures
- The use of XR to examine perceptual illusions
- Testing changes in sensory perception over extended periods of immersion
- Comparisons of perception in XR to the real world using behavioral or physiological measures


Keywords: Perception, Neuroscience, Psychophysics, Objective Measures, Vision


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

31 January 2021 Abstract
21 June 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

31 January 2021 Abstract
21 June 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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