Research Topic

Heterogeneous Catalysis, Electrocatalysis and Photocatalysis of Nanomaterials for Chemical and Energy Conversion

About this Research Topic

Chemical and energy conversion is a major problem for human well-being and ecosystem health in the context of global change and human population growth. Catalysis, via either heterogeneous catalysis, photocatalysis or electrocatalysis, is an efficient and economic strategy to covert chemicals and energy into diverse and value-added forms of chemicals and energy. Heterogeneous catalysts allow the direct conversion between different chemicals with minimized energy consumption. While artificial photocatalysts and electrocatalysts convert solar energy and electric energy into chemical energy respectively. Through electrocatalysis, chemical reactions (e.g., CO2 reduction reaction, water splitting, N2 fixation, etc.) can occur by the reduction of flow electrons. Similarly, chemical reactions can also take place gently under the light irradiation. On the other side, these catalytic processes can be monitored by in-situ instruments, such as UV-vis spectroscopy, dark-field scattering, surface-enhanced Raman scattering, Raman, X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

The goal of this Research Topic is to collect the latest discoveries in electrocatalytic and photocatalytic systems utilizing artificial electrocatalysts and photocatalysts to efficiently convert electric energy and solar energy into chemical bonds. The induced hot charges/electromagnetic field, light scattering and plasmon resonance, which are affected by the interaction of light with nanomaterials (plasmonic metals or semiconductors), can promote the catalytic reaction. Besides, the electric energy can provide the flow electrons to decrease the chemical reaction energy. However, there are several critical issues that need to be addressed, including the catalytic efficiency, selectivity, economy, and reaction mechanisms. Rational design and synthesis of electrocatalysts and photocatalysts of nanomaterials are the main methods to solve those challenges.

We welcome researchers to submit Original Research and Review papers for this Research Topic. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:
• Nanomaterials for heterogeneous catalysis (C1 catalysis, hydrogenation reaction, coupling reaction, etc.).
• Plasmon-enhanced photocatalysis (CO2 reduction, hydrogen evolution reaction, N2 fixation and organic reaction).
• Electrocatalysis (CO2 reduction, hydrogen evolution reaction, N2 fixation, fuel cell and electrochemical organic reaction).
• Fundamental understanding of the growth mechanism of nanomaterials through in-situ techniques and theoretical computation method
• In-situ monitoring reaction mechanism in catalysis through surface-enhanced Raman scattering, XAS, IR and dark-field scattering, etc.
• Optic and electric devices for energy and sensing. Novel point/distributed sensing technology for various engineering fields


Keywords: nanomaterials, electrocatalysis, photocatalysis, heterogeneous catalysis, energy


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Chemical and energy conversion is a major problem for human well-being and ecosystem health in the context of global change and human population growth. Catalysis, via either heterogeneous catalysis, photocatalysis or electrocatalysis, is an efficient and economic strategy to covert chemicals and energy into diverse and value-added forms of chemicals and energy. Heterogeneous catalysts allow the direct conversion between different chemicals with minimized energy consumption. While artificial photocatalysts and electrocatalysts convert solar energy and electric energy into chemical energy respectively. Through electrocatalysis, chemical reactions (e.g., CO2 reduction reaction, water splitting, N2 fixation, etc.) can occur by the reduction of flow electrons. Similarly, chemical reactions can also take place gently under the light irradiation. On the other side, these catalytic processes can be monitored by in-situ instruments, such as UV-vis spectroscopy, dark-field scattering, surface-enhanced Raman scattering, Raman, X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

The goal of this Research Topic is to collect the latest discoveries in electrocatalytic and photocatalytic systems utilizing artificial electrocatalysts and photocatalysts to efficiently convert electric energy and solar energy into chemical bonds. The induced hot charges/electromagnetic field, light scattering and plasmon resonance, which are affected by the interaction of light with nanomaterials (plasmonic metals or semiconductors), can promote the catalytic reaction. Besides, the electric energy can provide the flow electrons to decrease the chemical reaction energy. However, there are several critical issues that need to be addressed, including the catalytic efficiency, selectivity, economy, and reaction mechanisms. Rational design and synthesis of electrocatalysts and photocatalysts of nanomaterials are the main methods to solve those challenges.

We welcome researchers to submit Original Research and Review papers for this Research Topic. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:
• Nanomaterials for heterogeneous catalysis (C1 catalysis, hydrogenation reaction, coupling reaction, etc.).
• Plasmon-enhanced photocatalysis (CO2 reduction, hydrogen evolution reaction, N2 fixation and organic reaction).
• Electrocatalysis (CO2 reduction, hydrogen evolution reaction, N2 fixation, fuel cell and electrochemical organic reaction).
• Fundamental understanding of the growth mechanism of nanomaterials through in-situ techniques and theoretical computation method
• In-situ monitoring reaction mechanism in catalysis through surface-enhanced Raman scattering, XAS, IR and dark-field scattering, etc.
• Optic and electric devices for energy and sensing. Novel point/distributed sensing technology for various engineering fields


Keywords: nanomaterials, electrocatalysis, photocatalysis, heterogeneous catalysis, energy


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

03 November 2020 Abstract
03 March 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

03 November 2020 Abstract
03 March 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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