Research Topic

Latest Advances on Resilient Infrastructure for Transformational Cities

About this Research Topic

The nature of planning and management for sustainable urban infrastructure are at constant challenge due to the changing spatial structure and its relationship between the downtowns, suburbs and interim spaces, and socio-cultural dynamics, characterized by high-density and active living, social cohesion, and internal displacement/migration (forced and volunteered). They are predominantly caused by (1) regular forces i.e. climate-induced challenges, notably floods, earthquakes, tornadoes, landslides and wildfires; and (2) disruptive forces, including global pandemics and e-commerce. Periodicity of these forces is unpredictable while their magnitude of consequences are unknown too.

Given the climate-driven rapid transformation dynamics, the enormity and trajectory of disaster-related damages took an ultra-dimension. This stems the need for a continuous evaluation of disaster preparedness of cities and regions to assess the status of resilience on account of recent change dynamics. This is more so when climate change is predicted to increase both the intensity and frequency of weather impacts that are going to put serious stress on the current stock of above-the-surface and buried infrastructures related to water, transportation and energy. Evidently, unprecedented intensity and frequent occurrence of multi-hazards turn out to be a “new” normal in the contemporary cities. Moreover, they pose a serious challenge on the current operational capacity of the infrastructure to deal with the composite impacts of such multi-hazards. Heightening damages of multiple-hazards along with the concomitant spatial, social, and cultural impacts of pandemic (e.g. COVID-19) and ever-growing e-commerce are the testimonies of “new” normality. Furthermore, these events expect to exacerbate the already-deteriorating level of services of the current infrastructures, the needed financial investment of which is at a huge deficit across the global cities. Due to the unpredictable nature of potential damages and stress, the pertaining knowledge of infrastructure financing, planning, and management needs to be re-evaluated in order to make the cities withstand against the future shocks while maintaining the standard level services.

This Research Topic attempts to investigate the impacts of regular (i.e. climate change) and disruptive forces (i.e. pandemics and e-commerce) on the spatial and socio-cultural transformation dynamics of the cities. The scope would entail resilient infrastructure planning and management decisions influenced by the given spatial and socio-cultural transformations.

Within this umbrella, we would like to invite papers with specific light on the influence of following transformation dynamics and but not limited to, on planning, financing, engineering, and management of the resilient infrastructure:

• Land use changes;
• Spatial structure of the cities;
• Urban mobility;
• Active living and transportation;
• Urbanization and high-density built-environment;
• Public spaces and physical interaction;
• Urban cohesion;
• Resilient city planning;
• Global pandemics e.g. COVID-19 and renewed approaches to urban planning;
• Multi-hazards and their changing nature of occurrence and intensity of damages;
• Real estate development;
• Urban and regional development;
• Rural-urban linkages, etc.

Empirical studies and review papers are welcome to submit that aim to promote both theoretical debates and contribute evidence-based scholarly knowledge to the current knowledge domain of resilient infrastructure.


Keywords: land use changes, spatial structure of cities, urban mobility, pandemics, natural and man-made disasters, real estate development


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The nature of planning and management for sustainable urban infrastructure are at constant challenge due to the changing spatial structure and its relationship between the downtowns, suburbs and interim spaces, and socio-cultural dynamics, characterized by high-density and active living, social cohesion, and internal displacement/migration (forced and volunteered). They are predominantly caused by (1) regular forces i.e. climate-induced challenges, notably floods, earthquakes, tornadoes, landslides and wildfires; and (2) disruptive forces, including global pandemics and e-commerce. Periodicity of these forces is unpredictable while their magnitude of consequences are unknown too.

Given the climate-driven rapid transformation dynamics, the enormity and trajectory of disaster-related damages took an ultra-dimension. This stems the need for a continuous evaluation of disaster preparedness of cities and regions to assess the status of resilience on account of recent change dynamics. This is more so when climate change is predicted to increase both the intensity and frequency of weather impacts that are going to put serious stress on the current stock of above-the-surface and buried infrastructures related to water, transportation and energy. Evidently, unprecedented intensity and frequent occurrence of multi-hazards turn out to be a “new” normal in the contemporary cities. Moreover, they pose a serious challenge on the current operational capacity of the infrastructure to deal with the composite impacts of such multi-hazards. Heightening damages of multiple-hazards along with the concomitant spatial, social, and cultural impacts of pandemic (e.g. COVID-19) and ever-growing e-commerce are the testimonies of “new” normality. Furthermore, these events expect to exacerbate the already-deteriorating level of services of the current infrastructures, the needed financial investment of which is at a huge deficit across the global cities. Due to the unpredictable nature of potential damages and stress, the pertaining knowledge of infrastructure financing, planning, and management needs to be re-evaluated in order to make the cities withstand against the future shocks while maintaining the standard level services.

This Research Topic attempts to investigate the impacts of regular (i.e. climate change) and disruptive forces (i.e. pandemics and e-commerce) on the spatial and socio-cultural transformation dynamics of the cities. The scope would entail resilient infrastructure planning and management decisions influenced by the given spatial and socio-cultural transformations.

Within this umbrella, we would like to invite papers with specific light on the influence of following transformation dynamics and but not limited to, on planning, financing, engineering, and management of the resilient infrastructure:

• Land use changes;
• Spatial structure of the cities;
• Urban mobility;
• Active living and transportation;
• Urbanization and high-density built-environment;
• Public spaces and physical interaction;
• Urban cohesion;
• Resilient city planning;
• Global pandemics e.g. COVID-19 and renewed approaches to urban planning;
• Multi-hazards and their changing nature of occurrence and intensity of damages;
• Real estate development;
• Urban and regional development;
• Rural-urban linkages, etc.

Empirical studies and review papers are welcome to submit that aim to promote both theoretical debates and contribute evidence-based scholarly knowledge to the current knowledge domain of resilient infrastructure.


Keywords: land use changes, spatial structure of cities, urban mobility, pandemics, natural and man-made disasters, real estate development


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

03 November 2020 Abstract
03 March 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

03 November 2020 Abstract
03 March 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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