Research Topic

Solid-State Battery Technologies for Future Energy Storage

About this Research Topic

Renewable energy storage technologies based on secondary batteries play a vital role in providing sustainable energy solutions to society. The most important futuristic high power battery markets are within transportation (e.g. electrical vehicles) sector and as intermittent storage facilities (for renewable energy sources such as wind turbines and photovoltaics), where short term storage (minutes to hours) is necessary due to their intermittent nature.
In order to achieve this, Li-ion battery (LIB) technology needs to attain a higher energy density, ensure system safety, balance costs and mitigate undesirable environmental effects. Unfortunately, the conventional organic liquid based LIB is unable to fulfil all of these requirements. This leads to the growing interest in Solid-State Battery (SSB) technologies. SSBs offer better safety features by the replacement of an organic liquid electrolyte with a safer and more reliable inorganic solid electrolyte (SE), which gives a simpler battery design with improved safety and durability. At the same time, the possibility of using Li metal in SSBs enhances the energy density considerably. SSBs offer improved safety features and promise a much higher energy density. However, there are key issues that remain unsolved, hindering the full-scale commercialization.

The performance of SSBs is strongly dependent on the mechanical, physical, and chemical properties of the solid electrolyte and their interfaces/interphases with anode and cathode electrodes. This special issue will collect the most recent developments, emerging trends, and challenges in the field of Solid-State battery technologies.
Contributions will cover both fundamental and applied aspects of advanced SSBs and are focused on the following potential topics:
• Design and development of inorganic, polymer, and composite polymer solid electrolytes for alkali metal batteries
• Solid electrolytes for Metal-Sulfur batteries
• Progress in solid electrolytes for battery technologies beyond lithium-ion (Sodium, Magnesium, Fluoride, Chloride, etc.).
• Advanced characterization techniques for Solid-State Battery technologies
• Computation-accelerated designs towards Solid-State Battery materials


Keywords: Solid-State electrolyte, Electrochemistry, Interfaces, Battery, Electrodes


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Renewable energy storage technologies based on secondary batteries play a vital role in providing sustainable energy solutions to society. The most important futuristic high power battery markets are within transportation (e.g. electrical vehicles) sector and as intermittent storage facilities (for renewable energy sources such as wind turbines and photovoltaics), where short term storage (minutes to hours) is necessary due to their intermittent nature.
In order to achieve this, Li-ion battery (LIB) technology needs to attain a higher energy density, ensure system safety, balance costs and mitigate undesirable environmental effects. Unfortunately, the conventional organic liquid based LIB is unable to fulfil all of these requirements. This leads to the growing interest in Solid-State Battery (SSB) technologies. SSBs offer better safety features by the replacement of an organic liquid electrolyte with a safer and more reliable inorganic solid electrolyte (SE), which gives a simpler battery design with improved safety and durability. At the same time, the possibility of using Li metal in SSBs enhances the energy density considerably. SSBs offer improved safety features and promise a much higher energy density. However, there are key issues that remain unsolved, hindering the full-scale commercialization.

The performance of SSBs is strongly dependent on the mechanical, physical, and chemical properties of the solid electrolyte and their interfaces/interphases with anode and cathode electrodes. This special issue will collect the most recent developments, emerging trends, and challenges in the field of Solid-State battery technologies.
Contributions will cover both fundamental and applied aspects of advanced SSBs and are focused on the following potential topics:
• Design and development of inorganic, polymer, and composite polymer solid electrolytes for alkali metal batteries
• Solid electrolytes for Metal-Sulfur batteries
• Progress in solid electrolytes for battery technologies beyond lithium-ion (Sodium, Magnesium, Fluoride, Chloride, etc.).
• Advanced characterization techniques for Solid-State Battery technologies
• Computation-accelerated designs towards Solid-State Battery materials


Keywords: Solid-State electrolyte, Electrochemistry, Interfaces, Battery, Electrodes


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

22 April 2021 Manuscript
20 May 2021 Manuscript Extension

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

22 April 2021 Manuscript
20 May 2021 Manuscript Extension

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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