Research Topic

Molecular Crosstalk Between mRNA Decay Factors and the Gene Transcription Machinery

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About this Research Topic

Gene expression is a highly regulated process that adapts cellular content in RNAs and proteins to the cellular context. Under steady-state conditions, cellular mRNA homeostasis is robustly maintained by the cross-talk between nuclear transcription and cytoplasmic mRNA stability. A key piece in this crosstalk is the highly conserved 5′ -3′ RNA exonuclease Xrn1, which degrades most cytoplasmic mRNAs but also associates with nuclear chromatin to activate transcription by not well-understood mechanisms. Other decay factors, such as the Ccr4-Not complex and poly A tail binding factors have also been shown to participate in the mRNA decay/gene transcription cross-talk and mRNA homeostasis. One of the aspects of this molecular dialogue is mRNA imprinting, by which the fate of an mRNA in terms of translation and stability is co-transcriptionally predetermined. In the last years, work has started to decipher the mechanisms that connect forwards and backwards the different phases of gene expression. 
 
The goal of this Research Topic is to bring together the results obtained in the transcription/decay crosstalk mechanisms from different organisms and scientific backgrounds in a single journal issue that allows to find similarities and differences between decay factors, mechanisms and organisms. The study of the biochemical, molecular and biological functions of the transcription/decay factors involved in this crosstalk will help to understand how these proteins can perform apparently opposite activities such as synthesis and degradation of mRNAs. Additionally, studies deepening the study of mRNA homeostasis, at the global mRNA level or at the level of specific mRNA groups, will increase our understanding of the need for crosstalk systems between processes. Crosstalk can also be used for situations where mRNA homeostasis is not the goal but where changes in synthesis and degradation rates cooperate synergistically to change mRNA levels. A global vision of the current state of the subject would allow to focus future studies. Currently, most studies have been carried out in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae but increasing evidence of similar mechanisms is being found in higher eukaryotes.

This Research Topic will accept Original Research articles, Opinions, Perspectives and Reviews on Xrn1 and other transcription or decay factors in the context of transcription/decay crosstalk, or those related to the biological functions of these crosstalk factors that could cast light on the molecular mechanisms of the crosstalk. Papers investigating the control of mRNA homeostasis or those investigating synergistic changes in synthesis and mRNA degradation rates in different circumstances and contexts will also be accepted.


Keywords: Xrn1, Ccr4-Not, transcription, mRNA decay, gene expression, crosstalk


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Gene expression is a highly regulated process that adapts cellular content in RNAs and proteins to the cellular context. Under steady-state conditions, cellular mRNA homeostasis is robustly maintained by the cross-talk between nuclear transcription and cytoplasmic mRNA stability. A key piece in this crosstalk is the highly conserved 5′ -3′ RNA exonuclease Xrn1, which degrades most cytoplasmic mRNAs but also associates with nuclear chromatin to activate transcription by not well-understood mechanisms. Other decay factors, such as the Ccr4-Not complex and poly A tail binding factors have also been shown to participate in the mRNA decay/gene transcription cross-talk and mRNA homeostasis. One of the aspects of this molecular dialogue is mRNA imprinting, by which the fate of an mRNA in terms of translation and stability is co-transcriptionally predetermined. In the last years, work has started to decipher the mechanisms that connect forwards and backwards the different phases of gene expression. 
 
The goal of this Research Topic is to bring together the results obtained in the transcription/decay crosstalk mechanisms from different organisms and scientific backgrounds in a single journal issue that allows to find similarities and differences between decay factors, mechanisms and organisms. The study of the biochemical, molecular and biological functions of the transcription/decay factors involved in this crosstalk will help to understand how these proteins can perform apparently opposite activities such as synthesis and degradation of mRNAs. Additionally, studies deepening the study of mRNA homeostasis, at the global mRNA level or at the level of specific mRNA groups, will increase our understanding of the need for crosstalk systems between processes. Crosstalk can also be used for situations where mRNA homeostasis is not the goal but where changes in synthesis and degradation rates cooperate synergistically to change mRNA levels. A global vision of the current state of the subject would allow to focus future studies. Currently, most studies have been carried out in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae but increasing evidence of similar mechanisms is being found in higher eukaryotes.

This Research Topic will accept Original Research articles, Opinions, Perspectives and Reviews on Xrn1 and other transcription or decay factors in the context of transcription/decay crosstalk, or those related to the biological functions of these crosstalk factors that could cast light on the molecular mechanisms of the crosstalk. Papers investigating the control of mRNA homeostasis or those investigating synergistic changes in synthesis and mRNA degradation rates in different circumstances and contexts will also be accepted.


Keywords: Xrn1, Ccr4-Not, transcription, mRNA decay, gene expression, crosstalk


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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