Research Topic

Insights into the Physiology and Epidemiology of Arthropod-Vector Borne Diseases

About this Research Topic

Arthropods, such as mosquitoes, ticks, sand flies and fleas, are vectors for a large number of human and animal pathogens having a direct significant impact on public health. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) vector-borne diseases (VBDs) cause close to a million human deaths annually and account for more than 17% of all infectious diseases. These include, among others, malaria, dengue, schistosomiasis, human African trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, Chagas disease, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis, and onchocerciasis.
The vast majority of VBDs are transmitted through bloodsucking arthropod species, which during their blood meal ingest pathogens from an infected host (human or animal) and transmit it into a new host after a period of incubation during which the pathogen has replicated. It is well known that the efficient pathogen transmission of arthropod vector-borne diseases is particularly sensitive to climatic conditions. Above all, variation in climatic conditions at different scales such as temperature, rainfall patterns or humidity may have intense effects on the physiology and life cycles of arthropods. For instance, the longevity or reproduction of mosquitoes, its interactions with natural enemies and the consequent development of development and transmission of parasites is strongly influenced by environmental and climatic factors. Additionally, successful zoonotic or anthroponotic transmission of pathogens through phlebotomine sand fly species and ticks depends also on suitable environment and climate. Yet there remain persistent gaps in understanding of vital rates and drivers in even the most studied VBDs systems.

The aim of the current Research topic is to explore and cover some of the latest multidisciplinary research on the physiology and epidemiology of VBDs given emphasis on the study of the physiological aspects of arthropod vectors maintained in nature, as well as to explore the factors that influence vector-parasite-host interactions and epidemiology. In this context we welcome the submissions of original research or review articles focusing on, but not limited to:

• The study of novel physiological aspects of arthropod vector physiology and behavior, such as vector survival, reproduction, host seeking behavior and chemical ecology, biting and feeding pattern.
• Epidemiological and clinical impact of vector borne diseases at the population and/or individual/molecular level.
• Exploring and modeling complex gonotrophic transmission cycles, pathogen incubation and the efficient transmission among multiple hosts.
• Detecting environmental and social drivers affecting vector-borne disease physiology and transmission in addition to climate change as well as epidemiological changes.
• Public health initiatives and geographical distribution, prevalence, and pathogenicity.
• Control strategies of arthropod vectors, including impacts of genetically engineered mosquitoes.


Keywords: Mosquito, Ticks, Sand Flies, Epidemiology, Modeling


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Arthropods, such as mosquitoes, ticks, sand flies and fleas, are vectors for a large number of human and animal pathogens having a direct significant impact on public health. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) vector-borne diseases (VBDs) cause close to a million human deaths annually and account for more than 17% of all infectious diseases. These include, among others, malaria, dengue, schistosomiasis, human African trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, Chagas disease, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis, and onchocerciasis.
The vast majority of VBDs are transmitted through bloodsucking arthropod species, which during their blood meal ingest pathogens from an infected host (human or animal) and transmit it into a new host after a period of incubation during which the pathogen has replicated. It is well known that the efficient pathogen transmission of arthropod vector-borne diseases is particularly sensitive to climatic conditions. Above all, variation in climatic conditions at different scales such as temperature, rainfall patterns or humidity may have intense effects on the physiology and life cycles of arthropods. For instance, the longevity or reproduction of mosquitoes, its interactions with natural enemies and the consequent development of development and transmission of parasites is strongly influenced by environmental and climatic factors. Additionally, successful zoonotic or anthroponotic transmission of pathogens through phlebotomine sand fly species and ticks depends also on suitable environment and climate. Yet there remain persistent gaps in understanding of vital rates and drivers in even the most studied VBDs systems.

The aim of the current Research topic is to explore and cover some of the latest multidisciplinary research on the physiology and epidemiology of VBDs given emphasis on the study of the physiological aspects of arthropod vectors maintained in nature, as well as to explore the factors that influence vector-parasite-host interactions and epidemiology. In this context we welcome the submissions of original research or review articles focusing on, but not limited to:

• The study of novel physiological aspects of arthropod vector physiology and behavior, such as vector survival, reproduction, host seeking behavior and chemical ecology, biting and feeding pattern.
• Epidemiological and clinical impact of vector borne diseases at the population and/or individual/molecular level.
• Exploring and modeling complex gonotrophic transmission cycles, pathogen incubation and the efficient transmission among multiple hosts.
• Detecting environmental and social drivers affecting vector-borne disease physiology and transmission in addition to climate change as well as epidemiological changes.
• Public health initiatives and geographical distribution, prevalence, and pathogenicity.
• Control strategies of arthropod vectors, including impacts of genetically engineered mosquitoes.


Keywords: Mosquito, Ticks, Sand Flies, Epidemiology, Modeling


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

15 December 2020 Abstract
30 September 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

15 December 2020 Abstract
30 September 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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