Research Topic

Indigenous Research of Personality from Perspectives of Globalization and Glocalization

About this Research Topic

A long-term challenge in studying personality has been to strike a balance between seeking the universality of structure and describing the rich changes in personality due to cultural and background differences. In recent decades, personality research has been dominated by Western- (Euro-American-) based theories, and self-construction has been dominantly emphasized. However, because of the neglect of the cultural particularity of personality (e.g., interpersonal relatedness), Western-based theories have been challenged in theory and practice when used in non-western contexts. Accordingly, beyond those traditional Western-etic studies, non-Western-emic personality research focusing on the indigenously addressing personality in non-Western contexts started in the 1970s.

There are two basic types of indigenous research in non-Western personality. If we regard the imported-etic research on the personality of mainstream Western psychology in non-Western contexts as a manifestation of globalization, then understanding the construct of Western-based personality with non-Western thinking can be regarded as glocalization in indigenous research of personality. The other type of indigenous personality research is, beyond those Western-based personality constructs, to explore and construct the personality embedded in specific non-Western cultural contexts (e.g., Chinese culture).

Over the past five decades, a substantial amount of indigenous research has been devoted to addressing personality in non-Western, for example, Chinese and South African communities, and specifically investigating how Western-based personality constructs, or indigenous personality constructs in explaining ones' behaviors in specific non-Western settings. Furthermore, with the worldwide interactions among various cultures (e.g., between Eastern and Western cultures), some indigenous personality constructs proposed in non-Western backgrounds have also been paid attention to in Western backgrounds. This may be considered to be the glocalization from non-West to West in indigenous personality research.

However, neither the abovementioned two types of indigenous personality research nor the glocalization research of non-Western personality in Western contexts has been adequately represented in the mainstream international personality research community.

This Research Topic aims to provide a showcase for recent advances in indigenous research of personality from perspectives of globalization and glocalization. The main goals are as follows: (1) To clarify/examine those Western-highlighted personality constructs in a non-western context; (2) beyond the contribution of Western-highlighted personality constructs, to examine the incremental validity of those non-Western-highlighted personality constructs in a specific context; (3) to examine the construct validity of those non-Western highlighted personality constructs; and (4) to examine the cross-cultural validity of non-Western highlighted personality constructs in a specific context.

The sub-fields/topics include but are not limited to the following:
(1) Theoretical discussions of indigenous personality constructs from perspectives of globalization and glocalization.
(2) Research on Western-highlighted personality constructs in non-Western contexts.
(3) Research on non-Western-highlighted personality constructs in non-Western contexts (e.g., interpersonal relatedness in a Chinese context).
(4) Research non-Western-highlighted personality constructs in Western contexts (e.g., interpersonal relatedness in a US context).
(5) Cross-culturally comparative research of those Western-highlighted/ non-Western-highlighted personality constructs.


Keywords: Personality, Indigenous Research, Globalization, Glocalization, Culture


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

A long-term challenge in studying personality has been to strike a balance between seeking the universality of structure and describing the rich changes in personality due to cultural and background differences. In recent decades, personality research has been dominated by Western- (Euro-American-) based theories, and self-construction has been dominantly emphasized. However, because of the neglect of the cultural particularity of personality (e.g., interpersonal relatedness), Western-based theories have been challenged in theory and practice when used in non-western contexts. Accordingly, beyond those traditional Western-etic studies, non-Western-emic personality research focusing on the indigenously addressing personality in non-Western contexts started in the 1970s.

There are two basic types of indigenous research in non-Western personality. If we regard the imported-etic research on the personality of mainstream Western psychology in non-Western contexts as a manifestation of globalization, then understanding the construct of Western-based personality with non-Western thinking can be regarded as glocalization in indigenous research of personality. The other type of indigenous personality research is, beyond those Western-based personality constructs, to explore and construct the personality embedded in specific non-Western cultural contexts (e.g., Chinese culture).

Over the past five decades, a substantial amount of indigenous research has been devoted to addressing personality in non-Western, for example, Chinese and South African communities, and specifically investigating how Western-based personality constructs, or indigenous personality constructs in explaining ones' behaviors in specific non-Western settings. Furthermore, with the worldwide interactions among various cultures (e.g., between Eastern and Western cultures), some indigenous personality constructs proposed in non-Western backgrounds have also been paid attention to in Western backgrounds. This may be considered to be the glocalization from non-West to West in indigenous personality research.

However, neither the abovementioned two types of indigenous personality research nor the glocalization research of non-Western personality in Western contexts has been adequately represented in the mainstream international personality research community.

This Research Topic aims to provide a showcase for recent advances in indigenous research of personality from perspectives of globalization and glocalization. The main goals are as follows: (1) To clarify/examine those Western-highlighted personality constructs in a non-western context; (2) beyond the contribution of Western-highlighted personality constructs, to examine the incremental validity of those non-Western-highlighted personality constructs in a specific context; (3) to examine the construct validity of those non-Western highlighted personality constructs; and (4) to examine the cross-cultural validity of non-Western highlighted personality constructs in a specific context.

The sub-fields/topics include but are not limited to the following:
(1) Theoretical discussions of indigenous personality constructs from perspectives of globalization and glocalization.
(2) Research on Western-highlighted personality constructs in non-Western contexts.
(3) Research on non-Western-highlighted personality constructs in non-Western contexts (e.g., interpersonal relatedness in a Chinese context).
(4) Research non-Western-highlighted personality constructs in Western contexts (e.g., interpersonal relatedness in a US context).
(5) Cross-culturally comparative research of those Western-highlighted/ non-Western-highlighted personality constructs.


Keywords: Personality, Indigenous Research, Globalization, Glocalization, Culture


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

14 December 2020 Abstract
13 April 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

14 December 2020 Abstract
13 April 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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