Research Topic

Electrophysiology as a Path to Sustainable Crop and Food Production

About this Research Topic

Plant electrophysiology studies the electrochemical phenomena associated with plant cells and tissues at different scales and in the response to stimuli such as applied pressure, chemical substances, thermal stimuli, electrical or magnetic stimuli, and mechanical stimuli.

To date, the work in the area of plant electrophysiology has mainly contributed to the understanding of molecular physiology, plant physiological processes, plant development, photoelectric response, and defending mechanisms.

More recently, the findings in the field of plant electrophysiology gained popularity in the direction of the early detection of different abiotic (drought, heat, wind) and biotic (pests and diseases’ attack) stress factors before any symptoms become visible on the plant. This potential is very useful, both for advancing plant science and agricultural technology, as well as for helping the crop and food producers to make informed, cost-efficient decisions. This technology may allow them to deliver healthy food products with low environmental impacts, meeting the growing expectations of the consumers.

In this context, the plant electrophysiology is continuously being researched in order to address specific questions concerning the early detection of new stress factors, and specific pests and diseases, new crops types and crop varieties, detection of the effects of pesticides and pollutants on plants, and the influence of electrophysiology on yield and quality parameters. The universality or the specificity of the electric signals associated with the different stimuli across different crops are also requiring attention.

More specifically, recent advances can be employed including, but not limited to, surface potential, imaging, or sap flow. These techniques could contribute to advances in research on, but not limited to, long-distance electrical signaling occurring in plants, as well as on its applicability to crop and food production. Additional ongoing research on the potential of artificial intelligence tools contributing to the early detection of the above-mentioned stress factors is also targeted.

We welcome submissions in the format of original research articles, systematic review articles, and meta-analyses, which address, but are not limited to, the following themes:
• Accuracy of stress predictability of the existing plant electrophysiology methods;
• Adoption of the existing plant electrophysiology methods by different user types;
• The potential of plant electrophysiology to improve the yield and quality parameters;
• The potential of plant electrophysiology on the production of healthy food with low environmental impact;
• The potential of plant electrophysiology to detect the effect of pollutants and pesticides on plants;
• The potential of plant electrophysiology to contribute to precision irrigation, fertilization, and phytosanitary control ;
• The identification of similarities of electric signals in response to the different stimuli;
• The integration of electrophysiology technology with climate control technology used for crop production;
• The potential of plant electrophysiology to contribute to the sustainability of crop and food production in terms of environmental impacts.


Keywords: Electrophysiology, biotic stress, abiotic stress, crop production, sustainability


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Plant electrophysiology studies the electrochemical phenomena associated with plant cells and tissues at different scales and in the response to stimuli such as applied pressure, chemical substances, thermal stimuli, electrical or magnetic stimuli, and mechanical stimuli.

To date, the work in the area of plant electrophysiology has mainly contributed to the understanding of molecular physiology, plant physiological processes, plant development, photoelectric response, and defending mechanisms.

More recently, the findings in the field of plant electrophysiology gained popularity in the direction of the early detection of different abiotic (drought, heat, wind) and biotic (pests and diseases’ attack) stress factors before any symptoms become visible on the plant. This potential is very useful, both for advancing plant science and agricultural technology, as well as for helping the crop and food producers to make informed, cost-efficient decisions. This technology may allow them to deliver healthy food products with low environmental impacts, meeting the growing expectations of the consumers.

In this context, the plant electrophysiology is continuously being researched in order to address specific questions concerning the early detection of new stress factors, and specific pests and diseases, new crops types and crop varieties, detection of the effects of pesticides and pollutants on plants, and the influence of electrophysiology on yield and quality parameters. The universality or the specificity of the electric signals associated with the different stimuli across different crops are also requiring attention.

More specifically, recent advances can be employed including, but not limited to, surface potential, imaging, or sap flow. These techniques could contribute to advances in research on, but not limited to, long-distance electrical signaling occurring in plants, as well as on its applicability to crop and food production. Additional ongoing research on the potential of artificial intelligence tools contributing to the early detection of the above-mentioned stress factors is also targeted.

We welcome submissions in the format of original research articles, systematic review articles, and meta-analyses, which address, but are not limited to, the following themes:
• Accuracy of stress predictability of the existing plant electrophysiology methods;
• Adoption of the existing plant electrophysiology methods by different user types;
• The potential of plant electrophysiology to improve the yield and quality parameters;
• The potential of plant electrophysiology on the production of healthy food with low environmental impact;
• The potential of plant electrophysiology to detect the effect of pollutants and pesticides on plants;
• The potential of plant electrophysiology to contribute to precision irrigation, fertilization, and phytosanitary control ;
• The identification of similarities of electric signals in response to the different stimuli;
• The integration of electrophysiology technology with climate control technology used for crop production;
• The potential of plant electrophysiology to contribute to the sustainability of crop and food production in terms of environmental impacts.


Keywords: Electrophysiology, biotic stress, abiotic stress, crop production, sustainability


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

11 January 2021 Abstract
11 May 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

11 January 2021 Abstract
11 May 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..