Research Topic

The Interaction Between Cognition, Mood, Psychosis and Impulse Control Behavior in Parkinson’s Disease

About this Research Topic

In addition to increasingly severe motor symptoms, people with Parkinson’s disease (PD) can also experience distressing behavioral symptoms of cognitive impairment, affective disorder, psychosis and/or impulse control disorder. These behavioral symptoms can be even more disabling than the motor symptoms, significantly lowering quality of life for patients and their families, and placing considerable burden upon health services, often requiring crisis-led intervention and costly emergency hospital admissions. Despite the clinical, functional and economic significance of these behavioral symptoms, we still know very little about them, and in particular how they relate to one another. Although several studies have investigated each of these symptoms in detail, there has been relatively little investigation into the other symptoms in the same sample. Thus, there has been no systematic investigation of how each of these behavioral symptoms mediate the expression of the others. This significantly limits development of appropriate preventative or management strategies.

Recent expert investigations have documented the frequency and character of distressing behavioral symptoms in PD. Further research is now urgently needed to improve our understanding of how these symptoms combine to modulate risk and shape their expression. Such advances would enable us to develop more effective and targeted treatment protocols, and in turn improve patients’ quality of life and mitigate impact upon health services. Therefore, we now invite investigation into the relationship between the different behavioral symptoms in PD.

We welcome submission of all article types addressing this topic. In particular, we would be interested to receive submissions on:
• The frequency of different behavioral symptoms in the same sample;
• The relationship between cognition, affect and psychotic symptoms;
• The relationship between cognition, affect and impulse control disorders;
• Risk factors for different behavioral symptoms;
• Neural correlates of different behavioral symptoms; and
• Longitudinal investigations into the course of behavioral symptoms.


Keywords: cognition, depression, anxiety, apathy, hallucinations, delusions, impulse control


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

In addition to increasingly severe motor symptoms, people with Parkinson’s disease (PD) can also experience distressing behavioral symptoms of cognitive impairment, affective disorder, psychosis and/or impulse control disorder. These behavioral symptoms can be even more disabling than the motor symptoms, significantly lowering quality of life for patients and their families, and placing considerable burden upon health services, often requiring crisis-led intervention and costly emergency hospital admissions. Despite the clinical, functional and economic significance of these behavioral symptoms, we still know very little about them, and in particular how they relate to one another. Although several studies have investigated each of these symptoms in detail, there has been relatively little investigation into the other symptoms in the same sample. Thus, there has been no systematic investigation of how each of these behavioral symptoms mediate the expression of the others. This significantly limits development of appropriate preventative or management strategies.

Recent expert investigations have documented the frequency and character of distressing behavioral symptoms in PD. Further research is now urgently needed to improve our understanding of how these symptoms combine to modulate risk and shape their expression. Such advances would enable us to develop more effective and targeted treatment protocols, and in turn improve patients’ quality of life and mitigate impact upon health services. Therefore, we now invite investigation into the relationship between the different behavioral symptoms in PD.

We welcome submission of all article types addressing this topic. In particular, we would be interested to receive submissions on:
• The frequency of different behavioral symptoms in the same sample;
• The relationship between cognition, affect and psychotic symptoms;
• The relationship between cognition, affect and impulse control disorders;
• Risk factors for different behavioral symptoms;
• Neural correlates of different behavioral symptoms; and
• Longitudinal investigations into the course of behavioral symptoms.


Keywords: cognition, depression, anxiety, apathy, hallucinations, delusions, impulse control


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

31 March 2021 Abstract
31 July 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

31 March 2021 Abstract
31 July 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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