Research Topic

Dam-Break: Complexity in Embankment Structures Design

About this Research Topic

Climate change is altering the spatial and temporal variability of the hydrometeorological parameters at a considerable degree by resulting in unpredicted extreme events such as floods. Floods are fast transient flows which may lead to structural failure of embankment structures such as dams, dikes, and levees while consequently affecting the adjacent settlements, causing loss of lives and substantial physical damage. In general, overtopping has been acknowledged as the leading cause of failure earth embankment structures, which occurs if the river discharge exceeds the design value of the levee during a flood event. However, other factors such as the seepage-induced piping or so-called “inner erosion “or “piping,” are also found to be frequent occurred in embankment structures. The failure mechanism can lead to significant erosion of the embankment or even complete breaching of the entire structure.

Failure will occur typically because of the complex interaction among flow discharge volume and embankment structure resistance. Namely, the landslide occurred in the riverside of the structure resulting in the removal of fines soil, lead to substantial loss of the entire stability of the structure itself. Risk assessment analysis on the failure of embankment dams often requires the prediction of basic geometric and temporal parameters of a breach or the estimation of peak breach outflows. Flow discharge is usually simplified following the generalized assumption that it can be directly linked to the probability of exceeding the levee design discharge a very often it may fail to represent unexcepted natural conditions due to transient nature of the water level fluctuation in the riverside of the embankment structure. Risk analysis studies bridging the hydrological, hydraulic, and geotechnical complexity interlinkage under overtopping and/or transient hydraulic conditions for earth embankment are scarcely found in the literature.
This Research Topic therefore welcomes studies focusing on the experimental investigation of the dam-break, including all types of embankment structures; numerical modelling (i.e., stochastic, finite elements, artificial intelligence etc.) of the dam-break covering both hydraulic and geotechnical aspects are also appreciated. Last but not least, we are also expecting studies on various maintenance and up-gradation techniques related to different types of embankment structures.


Keywords: Seepage, Piping, Seepage vulnerability, Levee failure, Animal burrows, Dike failure, Dam failure, Dike stability, Dam stability, Maintenance, Overtopping, Slope stability, Flooding, SEEP/W, Vulnerability, GEOSTUDIO, Transient conditions, Hydrodynamic modelling, CFD, Risk evaluation, Environmental impact


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Climate change is altering the spatial and temporal variability of the hydrometeorological parameters at a considerable degree by resulting in unpredicted extreme events such as floods. Floods are fast transient flows which may lead to structural failure of embankment structures such as dams, dikes, and levees while consequently affecting the adjacent settlements, causing loss of lives and substantial physical damage. In general, overtopping has been acknowledged as the leading cause of failure earth embankment structures, which occurs if the river discharge exceeds the design value of the levee during a flood event. However, other factors such as the seepage-induced piping or so-called “inner erosion “or “piping,” are also found to be frequent occurred in embankment structures. The failure mechanism can lead to significant erosion of the embankment or even complete breaching of the entire structure.

Failure will occur typically because of the complex interaction among flow discharge volume and embankment structure resistance. Namely, the landslide occurred in the riverside of the structure resulting in the removal of fines soil, lead to substantial loss of the entire stability of the structure itself. Risk assessment analysis on the failure of embankment dams often requires the prediction of basic geometric and temporal parameters of a breach or the estimation of peak breach outflows. Flow discharge is usually simplified following the generalized assumption that it can be directly linked to the probability of exceeding the levee design discharge a very often it may fail to represent unexcepted natural conditions due to transient nature of the water level fluctuation in the riverside of the embankment structure. Risk analysis studies bridging the hydrological, hydraulic, and geotechnical complexity interlinkage under overtopping and/or transient hydraulic conditions for earth embankment are scarcely found in the literature.
This Research Topic therefore welcomes studies focusing on the experimental investigation of the dam-break, including all types of embankment structures; numerical modelling (i.e., stochastic, finite elements, artificial intelligence etc.) of the dam-break covering both hydraulic and geotechnical aspects are also appreciated. Last but not least, we are also expecting studies on various maintenance and up-gradation techniques related to different types of embankment structures.


Keywords: Seepage, Piping, Seepage vulnerability, Levee failure, Animal burrows, Dike failure, Dam failure, Dike stability, Dam stability, Maintenance, Overtopping, Slope stability, Flooding, SEEP/W, Vulnerability, GEOSTUDIO, Transient conditions, Hydrodynamic modelling, CFD, Risk evaluation, Environmental impact


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

19 December 2020 Abstract
18 April 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

19 December 2020 Abstract
18 April 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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