Research Topic

Advances in Transparent Conducting Oxides for Optoelectronic Applications

About this Research Topic

Transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) are a class of wide bandgap (normally > 3.1 eV) oxide semiconductors with a high conductivity arising from impurities and/or native defects. Although the first TCO material (i.e., CdO) was discovered more than 100 years ago, TCOs are still attracting much attention in recent decades due to their increasing importance as a key component in many optoelectronic applications, including flat panel displays, low-e windows, and solar cells etc. TCO materials are primarily post-transition metal oxides (e.g., In2O3, SnO2, ZnO, CdO), with the tin-doped In2O3 (ITO) dominating the commercial TCOs market. Owing to their unique nature of electronic bands, these conventional TCO materials have a high propensity for n-type doping and can achieve a high conductivity close to the metal.

In most applications, high conductivity and good transparency over a wide spectral range are required. However, the commercial TCO materials represented by ITO suffer from several drawbacks, e.g., high cost of indium, low infrared transparency, lack of mechanical flexibility, etc. These deficiencies in conventional TCOs are major obstacles for the advent of novel optoelectronic devices. Hence, it is essential for the materials research community to explore new TCO materials and technologies to reduce their cost as well as to enhance their functionalities. To achieve this, collaborations of researchers from different disciplines are needed.

This Research Topic aims to provide a forum where researchers can share their most recent findings on the development in the field of TCOs. We welcome papers that highlight recent development in material synthesis, characterization, optoelectronic properties, defect physics or chemistry, stability, and device applications. Topics may include, but are not limited to:

- Synthesis and characterization of new TCOs
- Optical and electrical properties of TCOs
- Novel doping strategies for TCOs to achieve high mobility
- P-type TCOs
- Electronic structure and defect physics/chemistry in TCO materials
- Energy band engineering for TCOs with tailored optoelectronic properties
- Flexible TCO electrodes
- TCOs for optoelectronic applications and its related device physics


Keywords: transparent conducting oxides, optoelectronics, material growth, electronic structure, defects


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) are a class of wide bandgap (normally > 3.1 eV) oxide semiconductors with a high conductivity arising from impurities and/or native defects. Although the first TCO material (i.e., CdO) was discovered more than 100 years ago, TCOs are still attracting much attention in recent decades due to their increasing importance as a key component in many optoelectronic applications, including flat panel displays, low-e windows, and solar cells etc. TCO materials are primarily post-transition metal oxides (e.g., In2O3, SnO2, ZnO, CdO), with the tin-doped In2O3 (ITO) dominating the commercial TCOs market. Owing to their unique nature of electronic bands, these conventional TCO materials have a high propensity for n-type doping and can achieve a high conductivity close to the metal.

In most applications, high conductivity and good transparency over a wide spectral range are required. However, the commercial TCO materials represented by ITO suffer from several drawbacks, e.g., high cost of indium, low infrared transparency, lack of mechanical flexibility, etc. These deficiencies in conventional TCOs are major obstacles for the advent of novel optoelectronic devices. Hence, it is essential for the materials research community to explore new TCO materials and technologies to reduce their cost as well as to enhance their functionalities. To achieve this, collaborations of researchers from different disciplines are needed.

This Research Topic aims to provide a forum where researchers can share their most recent findings on the development in the field of TCOs. We welcome papers that highlight recent development in material synthesis, characterization, optoelectronic properties, defect physics or chemistry, stability, and device applications. Topics may include, but are not limited to:

- Synthesis and characterization of new TCOs
- Optical and electrical properties of TCOs
- Novel doping strategies for TCOs to achieve high mobility
- P-type TCOs
- Electronic structure and defect physics/chemistry in TCO materials
- Energy band engineering for TCOs with tailored optoelectronic properties
- Flexible TCO electrodes
- TCOs for optoelectronic applications and its related device physics


Keywords: transparent conducting oxides, optoelectronics, material growth, electronic structure, defects


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

11 January 2021 Abstract
03 May 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

11 January 2021 Abstract
03 May 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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