Research Topic

Design and Additive Manufacturing of Cellular Materials

About this Research Topic

Cellular materials are categorized by periodic or stochastic arrangement of open or closed cell polyhedral layouts. Four different types are classified with “stochastic + closed cell” such as cork, “stochastic + open cell” such as kitchen sponge, “periodic + closed cell” such as composite metallic foam, and “periodic + open cell” type lattice structure. The last group is defined as topologically ordered, three-dimensional structures consisting of single or multiple repeating unit cells, which are usually fabricated by additive manufacturing. In this way, the porosity, tortuosity and orientation of the cells can be well controlled to achieve extraordinary properties, making them an important class of architected metamaterials. Generally, the “periodic + open cell” class can be further divided into three groups: strut-based lattice structure (“lattice”), triply periodic minimal surface (TPMS) structure (“shellular”), and plate-based lattice structure (“plate”). These cellular structures possess very high specific stiffness and strength, as well as high surface to volume ratio, making them ideal for a wide range of applications, such as heat dissipation, bio-scaffolding and lightweighting.

Recent development in cellular materials led to the creation of new metamaterials comprising topologies that are specifically optimized and engineered for certain or multi functionalities. The topologically complex cellular materials with different length scales, ranging from nanoscale to macroscale, can be fabricated by the latest additive manufacturing technologies. These advancements have facilitated the emergence of a new design paradigm in which cellular material lattices with high levels of morphological complexity are directly integrated within the structure of functional components. This allows reducing the overall weight as well as enhancing the physical properties and multifunctionality. However, a major challenge in adopting this material-by-design approach is designing the appropriate lattice topology and developing the associated manufacturing process. Therefore, understanding the material -topology -property relationship, which describes the mechanical and physical properties as a function of the relative density and exhibited topology, is required for the invention of new metamaterial-by-design with improved end-use properties. We hope to shed some lights on the important issues of material design and additive manufacturing in the current Research Topic, which will advance our knowledge in the cellular materials-by-design field.

This Research Topic is open to all the cellular materials fabricated by AM and different aspects of their studies, including:
· Design of cellular materials
· New AM processes for cellular materials
· Properties of cellular materials (mechanical, thermal, electrical, etc)
· New or Multiscale characterization techniques of cellular materials
· Comparison between different cellular materials produced by AM
· Microstructural analysis of cellular materials


Keywords: additive manufacturing, design for additive manufacturing, cellular materials, lattice, metamaterials


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Cellular materials are categorized by periodic or stochastic arrangement of open or closed cell polyhedral layouts. Four different types are classified with “stochastic + closed cell” such as cork, “stochastic + open cell” such as kitchen sponge, “periodic + closed cell” such as composite metallic foam, and “periodic + open cell” type lattice structure. The last group is defined as topologically ordered, three-dimensional structures consisting of single or multiple repeating unit cells, which are usually fabricated by additive manufacturing. In this way, the porosity, tortuosity and orientation of the cells can be well controlled to achieve extraordinary properties, making them an important class of architected metamaterials. Generally, the “periodic + open cell” class can be further divided into three groups: strut-based lattice structure (“lattice”), triply periodic minimal surface (TPMS) structure (“shellular”), and plate-based lattice structure (“plate”). These cellular structures possess very high specific stiffness and strength, as well as high surface to volume ratio, making them ideal for a wide range of applications, such as heat dissipation, bio-scaffolding and lightweighting.

Recent development in cellular materials led to the creation of new metamaterials comprising topologies that are specifically optimized and engineered for certain or multi functionalities. The topologically complex cellular materials with different length scales, ranging from nanoscale to macroscale, can be fabricated by the latest additive manufacturing technologies. These advancements have facilitated the emergence of a new design paradigm in which cellular material lattices with high levels of morphological complexity are directly integrated within the structure of functional components. This allows reducing the overall weight as well as enhancing the physical properties and multifunctionality. However, a major challenge in adopting this material-by-design approach is designing the appropriate lattice topology and developing the associated manufacturing process. Therefore, understanding the material -topology -property relationship, which describes the mechanical and physical properties as a function of the relative density and exhibited topology, is required for the invention of new metamaterial-by-design with improved end-use properties. We hope to shed some lights on the important issues of material design and additive manufacturing in the current Research Topic, which will advance our knowledge in the cellular materials-by-design field.

This Research Topic is open to all the cellular materials fabricated by AM and different aspects of their studies, including:
· Design of cellular materials
· New AM processes for cellular materials
· Properties of cellular materials (mechanical, thermal, electrical, etc)
· New or Multiscale characterization techniques of cellular materials
· Comparison between different cellular materials produced by AM
· Microstructural analysis of cellular materials


Keywords: additive manufacturing, design for additive manufacturing, cellular materials, lattice, metamaterials


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

29 January 2021 Abstract
24 April 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

29 January 2021 Abstract
24 April 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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