Research Topic

Advances in Image Velocimetry for Sensing River Flows

About this Research Topic

Image-based techniques for sensing the transient nature of fluvial systems have been a focus for research within the hydrological sciences in recent times. Considerable progress has been made in developing change detection techniques which offer a new and extraordinary potential to improve our understanding on the morphological evolution of rivers and the dynamic of water in river systems. In particular, the scientific development of image velocimetry techniques has intensified, driven by the prospect of accurately quantifying hydrological flows and fluxes to advance understanding of hydrological processes, and their interactions in the fluvial environment. These tools and techniques offer environmental agencies the potential for accurately sensing hydrological and hydraulic processes in conditions where the deployment of traditional approaches may be challenging (e.g. during flood flow conditions when access to the channel may be hazardous). The application of image-based techniques for sensing the fluvial environment has been facilitated by technological advancements in sensing platforms (e.g. IP cameras, unmanned aerial systems, satellites), enhancing the potential spatiotemporal resolution of river flow velocity measurements and for advancements in process understanding.

Recent technological advances have led to the development of new methods and automated processing tools for non-intrusive sensing of river flow velocities across a range of hydro-geomorphic settings and flow conditions. However, these techniques are not widely adopted with practices varying between agencies. Examples of successful deployments, uncertainty and sensitivity assessments, and thorough appraisals of image velocimetry approaches are required to promote these approaches before they are widely viewed as established and standard techniques. Further development and wider application of novel methods for flow velocity sensing, such as image velocimetry techniques, has the potential to deepen our fundamental understanding of fluvial processes and advance water management practices all over the world.

This Research Topic seeks to publish articles that demonstrate the utility of image velocimetry techniques for sensing the fluvial environment; that advance the development of image-based techniques; and inform deployment practices for the sensing of river flow processes. Of particular interest are research articles and commentaries where image-based techniques have:
• Advanced fundamental understanding of fluvial processes (e.g. flood flow dynamics)
• Been used as the basis for predictions of fluvial processes (e.g. bank erosion, sediment transport)
• Led to the advancement of industrial, or management practices (e.g. river flow quantification, eco-hydraulic assessments, hazard assessment, assessment of engineering structure performance).
In addition, research articles that report technical advances are also welcomed. These may include, but are not limited to:
• New approaches for image-based sensing of river flows
• Assessments of the applicability and accuracy of existing workflows and techniques
• Advancement of existing image velocimetry techniques
• Methodological refinements and recommendations for best practice


Keywords: image velocimetry, river flow, fluvial processes


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Image-based techniques for sensing the transient nature of fluvial systems have been a focus for research within the hydrological sciences in recent times. Considerable progress has been made in developing change detection techniques which offer a new and extraordinary potential to improve our understanding on the morphological evolution of rivers and the dynamic of water in river systems. In particular, the scientific development of image velocimetry techniques has intensified, driven by the prospect of accurately quantifying hydrological flows and fluxes to advance understanding of hydrological processes, and their interactions in the fluvial environment. These tools and techniques offer environmental agencies the potential for accurately sensing hydrological and hydraulic processes in conditions where the deployment of traditional approaches may be challenging (e.g. during flood flow conditions when access to the channel may be hazardous). The application of image-based techniques for sensing the fluvial environment has been facilitated by technological advancements in sensing platforms (e.g. IP cameras, unmanned aerial systems, satellites), enhancing the potential spatiotemporal resolution of river flow velocity measurements and for advancements in process understanding.

Recent technological advances have led to the development of new methods and automated processing tools for non-intrusive sensing of river flow velocities across a range of hydro-geomorphic settings and flow conditions. However, these techniques are not widely adopted with practices varying between agencies. Examples of successful deployments, uncertainty and sensitivity assessments, and thorough appraisals of image velocimetry approaches are required to promote these approaches before they are widely viewed as established and standard techniques. Further development and wider application of novel methods for flow velocity sensing, such as image velocimetry techniques, has the potential to deepen our fundamental understanding of fluvial processes and advance water management practices all over the world.

This Research Topic seeks to publish articles that demonstrate the utility of image velocimetry techniques for sensing the fluvial environment; that advance the development of image-based techniques; and inform deployment practices for the sensing of river flow processes. Of particular interest are research articles and commentaries where image-based techniques have:
• Advanced fundamental understanding of fluvial processes (e.g. flood flow dynamics)
• Been used as the basis for predictions of fluvial processes (e.g. bank erosion, sediment transport)
• Led to the advancement of industrial, or management practices (e.g. river flow quantification, eco-hydraulic assessments, hazard assessment, assessment of engineering structure performance).
In addition, research articles that report technical advances are also welcomed. These may include, but are not limited to:
• New approaches for image-based sensing of river flows
• Assessments of the applicability and accuracy of existing workflows and techniques
• Advancement of existing image velocimetry techniques
• Methodological refinements and recommendations for best practice


Keywords: image velocimetry, river flow, fluvial processes


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

26 December 2020 Abstract
25 April 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

26 December 2020 Abstract
25 April 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..