Research Topic

Lubricant-Infused Surfaces: Advances in Theory, Design, and Applications

About this Research Topic

Lubricant-infused surfaces (LIS) or slippery liquid-infused porous surfaces (SLIPS) are a new class of surfaces that have excellent liquid repellent properties. In such slippery surfaces, a liquid lubricant is stabilized by capillary forces within a porous or nanostructured solid, resulting in a chemical homogeneous and atomically smooth liquid-liquid interface between the surface and the foreign liquid. The defect-free nature of LIS leads to reduced droplet pinning and easy droplet shedding, which has remarkable applicability to enhanced condensation, anti-icing, self-cleaning, antifouling, and biomedical devices in recent years. Furthermore, such smooth surfaces have been shown to be stable enough to maintain liquid repellency in various conditions, such as in high temperature and pressure for example. The novelty of LIS lies in its uniqueness to be applied to a broad spectrum of materials and lubricants, permitting a wide range of surface structure length scales and infusing liquid properties. Moreover, these liquid-infused interfaces can be specifically tuned to suit highly specialized functions, relevant to aerospace, energy and medical applications. With the rapid advancement in micro/nanofabrication techniques, not only alternative lubricants/materials for LIS have been proposed, but new advanced technologies have been developed to further exploit the LIS’s great advantages.

This Research Topic will present the most recent advances in this field with the aim of strengthening our understanding of stability and utility of LIS, both from a theoretical and experimental perspective. In particular, focus on the design principles for further enhancement of the LIS's performance will be presented. We seek for contributions covering recent progress on fundamental aspects, applications and development of novel liquid-infused surfaces. Experimental and theoretical contributions are equally encouraged. Both original research articles, in the form of full papers or communications, and reviews are welcome. A non-exhaustive list of topics includes:

• Design principles for stable LIS
• Choice of lubricants and surface structures in designing LIS
• LIS Experimental Investigation
• LIS Numerical Modeling
• Mechanisms of lubricant drainage
• Droplet mobility and manipulation on LIS
• Self-healing and anti-fouling
• Abrasion resistant and anti-corrosion
• Heat and mass transfer
• Durability and feasibility assessment
• LIS in Phase Change Processes
• LIS applications
• Future challenges


Keywords: LIS, SLIPS, Lubricants, Wettability, Slippery Surface, Self-healing, Liquid-liquid interaction, Self-cleaning


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Lubricant-infused surfaces (LIS) or slippery liquid-infused porous surfaces (SLIPS) are a new class of surfaces that have excellent liquid repellent properties. In such slippery surfaces, a liquid lubricant is stabilized by capillary forces within a porous or nanostructured solid, resulting in a chemical homogeneous and atomically smooth liquid-liquid interface between the surface and the foreign liquid. The defect-free nature of LIS leads to reduced droplet pinning and easy droplet shedding, which has remarkable applicability to enhanced condensation, anti-icing, self-cleaning, antifouling, and biomedical devices in recent years. Furthermore, such smooth surfaces have been shown to be stable enough to maintain liquid repellency in various conditions, such as in high temperature and pressure for example. The novelty of LIS lies in its uniqueness to be applied to a broad spectrum of materials and lubricants, permitting a wide range of surface structure length scales and infusing liquid properties. Moreover, these liquid-infused interfaces can be specifically tuned to suit highly specialized functions, relevant to aerospace, energy and medical applications. With the rapid advancement in micro/nanofabrication techniques, not only alternative lubricants/materials for LIS have been proposed, but new advanced technologies have been developed to further exploit the LIS’s great advantages.

This Research Topic will present the most recent advances in this field with the aim of strengthening our understanding of stability and utility of LIS, both from a theoretical and experimental perspective. In particular, focus on the design principles for further enhancement of the LIS's performance will be presented. We seek for contributions covering recent progress on fundamental aspects, applications and development of novel liquid-infused surfaces. Experimental and theoretical contributions are equally encouraged. Both original research articles, in the form of full papers or communications, and reviews are welcome. A non-exhaustive list of topics includes:

• Design principles for stable LIS
• Choice of lubricants and surface structures in designing LIS
• LIS Experimental Investigation
• LIS Numerical Modeling
• Mechanisms of lubricant drainage
• Droplet mobility and manipulation on LIS
• Self-healing and anti-fouling
• Abrasion resistant and anti-corrosion
• Heat and mass transfer
• Durability and feasibility assessment
• LIS in Phase Change Processes
• LIS applications
• Future challenges


Keywords: LIS, SLIPS, Lubricants, Wettability, Slippery Surface, Self-healing, Liquid-liquid interaction, Self-cleaning


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

13 January 2021 Abstract
14 May 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

13 January 2021 Abstract
14 May 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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