Research Topic

Surgical Oncology in the Geriatric Population

About this Research Topic

The world population continues to grow, in great part due to ageing; with the geriatric segment of the population experiencing the highest incremental growth. With a larger and older population, the overall number of patients with cancer will continue to increase. Surgery (resection) remains the primary treatment for patients with solid malignancies and is also critical tool for palliation and management of complications from advanced cancer. Given increased vulnerability of older patients, derived from more comorbidities and less physiologic reserve, understanding the impact these procedures have on geriatric patients with cancer remains critical for decision-making and patient counseling.

Although there is a good understanding of the potential increased vulnerability associated with increasing age, and how a number of geriatric syndromes affect overall outcomes following surgery, there is limited data on how to use screening information in the geriatric population, models of care, and the overall effect of cancer surgery (including the differential effect when compared to younger populations) on postoperative, patient-centered, and long-term oncologic outcomes.
The goals of this Research Topic are to provide the reader with valuable and up to date information regarding the different aspects related to surgery for cancer in the geriatric population, focusing specifically on geriatric assessment tools, postoperative outcomes, and the overall benefit of surgery as part of the treatment for cancer – true impact on survival for this population.

The scope of this issue will include different aspects of surgery for cancer in the geriatric population, spanning from the preoperative period to long-term outcomes – survival, and includes original research and review articles in the following topics:

• Risk-assessment tools: comprehensive geriatric assessment, frailty, vulnerability
• Decision-making models of care for the geriatric population with cancer
• Models of perioperative care (eg., geriatric consultation, geriatric units, other)
• Postoperative outcomes with an emphasis on outcomes of recovery
• Patient-centered outcomes
• Long-term outcomes for the geriatric population – with special emphasis on critical comparisons of survival benefits in older versus younger patients following surgery
• Different surgical and multimodality approaches for the geriatric population (e.g., robotic and other minimally invasive approaches, less/more multimodality treatments, etc.)


Keywords: Cancer, surgical oncology, geriatric surgery


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The world population continues to grow, in great part due to ageing; with the geriatric segment of the population experiencing the highest incremental growth. With a larger and older population, the overall number of patients with cancer will continue to increase. Surgery (resection) remains the primary treatment for patients with solid malignancies and is also critical tool for palliation and management of complications from advanced cancer. Given increased vulnerability of older patients, derived from more comorbidities and less physiologic reserve, understanding the impact these procedures have on geriatric patients with cancer remains critical for decision-making and patient counseling.

Although there is a good understanding of the potential increased vulnerability associated with increasing age, and how a number of geriatric syndromes affect overall outcomes following surgery, there is limited data on how to use screening information in the geriatric population, models of care, and the overall effect of cancer surgery (including the differential effect when compared to younger populations) on postoperative, patient-centered, and long-term oncologic outcomes.
The goals of this Research Topic are to provide the reader with valuable and up to date information regarding the different aspects related to surgery for cancer in the geriatric population, focusing specifically on geriatric assessment tools, postoperative outcomes, and the overall benefit of surgery as part of the treatment for cancer – true impact on survival for this population.

The scope of this issue will include different aspects of surgery for cancer in the geriatric population, spanning from the preoperative period to long-term outcomes – survival, and includes original research and review articles in the following topics:

• Risk-assessment tools: comprehensive geriatric assessment, frailty, vulnerability
• Decision-making models of care for the geriatric population with cancer
• Models of perioperative care (eg., geriatric consultation, geriatric units, other)
• Postoperative outcomes with an emphasis on outcomes of recovery
• Patient-centered outcomes
• Long-term outcomes for the geriatric population – with special emphasis on critical comparisons of survival benefits in older versus younger patients following surgery
• Different surgical and multimodality approaches for the geriatric population (e.g., robotic and other minimally invasive approaches, less/more multimodality treatments, etc.)


Keywords: Cancer, surgical oncology, geriatric surgery


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

05 February 2021 Abstract
07 May 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

05 February 2021 Abstract
07 May 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..