Research Topic

Surfaces for Energy Efficiency

About this Research Topic

Surfaces can be tuned to solve critical issues in energy efficiency engineering. Work lost and energy dissipation in mechanical and electromechanical devices consume valuable extra-fuel and energy that could be partially saved. Surface functionalization and thin film/coating deposition may help in achieving energy efficiency in machines. Whilst superlubricity can reduce friction forces in solid/solid interactions, ultra-hydrophobicity and ultra-oleophobicity can reduce viscosity in solid /liquid interactions. Surface engineering is able to grant cutting-edge surface material properties in energy efficiency issues not only for physical and/or chemical modification but also for improving adhesions of thin films and coatings deposited on material surfaces.

Work lost and energy dissipation can be reduced by means of lower friction and fluidity in boundary layer in moving mechanisms. How to reduce both friction and fluidity is to hinder molecular interactions and energy transfer pathways by diminishing dissipative events. At the atomic-scale, friction and fluidity are ultimate controlled by intermolecular forces. Moreover, dissipation mechanisms such as elastic and plastic deformation and phononic and electronic damping are the most common pathways for energy dissipation. Surfaces can be pattered / texturized / (micro)nano-structured to reduce friction forces and enhance fluid dynamics for energy efficiency issues. In addition, chemical modification and thin film / coating deposition are capable to modify the material outermost layer to tune surface properties like friction and fluidity in boundary layer as well as ultra-hydrophobicity and ultra-oleophobicity all related in applications in energy efficiency engineering.

Surface engineering can help to reduce friction and fluidity in boundary layer for energy efficient issues. Functionalized surfaces can be obtained by physical and/or chemical methods. Surface properties are tunable by specific topographies and morphologies and also by specific chemical elements and compounds. We welcome submissions for Research Topic in energy efficiency engineering, a highly interdisciplinary field that seeks to characterize and modify surfaces and interfaces for both scientific and technological purposes.

Theoretical, numerical, and experimental approaches are welcome and the topics of interest include, but are not limited to:
• Surface pattering and texturing
• Surface micro/nano-structuring
• Methods as laser surface modification, shot peening for micro and nano-attrition, etc for physical modification
• Coatings and thin films for superlubricity
• Thermochemical treatment for chemical element diffusion and plasma enhanced/assisted chemical vapor deposition and physical vapor deposition;
• Adhesion of coatings and thin films on vitreous, ceramic and metallic materials
• Ultra-hydrophobicity and Ultra-oleophobicity


Keywords: surface engineering, surface functionalization, energy efficiency, surface materials, superlubricity, ultra-hydrophobicity, Ultra-oleophobicity


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Surfaces can be tuned to solve critical issues in energy efficiency engineering. Work lost and energy dissipation in mechanical and electromechanical devices consume valuable extra-fuel and energy that could be partially saved. Surface functionalization and thin film/coating deposition may help in achieving energy efficiency in machines. Whilst superlubricity can reduce friction forces in solid/solid interactions, ultra-hydrophobicity and ultra-oleophobicity can reduce viscosity in solid /liquid interactions. Surface engineering is able to grant cutting-edge surface material properties in energy efficiency issues not only for physical and/or chemical modification but also for improving adhesions of thin films and coatings deposited on material surfaces.

Work lost and energy dissipation can be reduced by means of lower friction and fluidity in boundary layer in moving mechanisms. How to reduce both friction and fluidity is to hinder molecular interactions and energy transfer pathways by diminishing dissipative events. At the atomic-scale, friction and fluidity are ultimate controlled by intermolecular forces. Moreover, dissipation mechanisms such as elastic and plastic deformation and phononic and electronic damping are the most common pathways for energy dissipation. Surfaces can be pattered / texturized / (micro)nano-structured to reduce friction forces and enhance fluid dynamics for energy efficiency issues. In addition, chemical modification and thin film / coating deposition are capable to modify the material outermost layer to tune surface properties like friction and fluidity in boundary layer as well as ultra-hydrophobicity and ultra-oleophobicity all related in applications in energy efficiency engineering.

Surface engineering can help to reduce friction and fluidity in boundary layer for energy efficient issues. Functionalized surfaces can be obtained by physical and/or chemical methods. Surface properties are tunable by specific topographies and morphologies and also by specific chemical elements and compounds. We welcome submissions for Research Topic in energy efficiency engineering, a highly interdisciplinary field that seeks to characterize and modify surfaces and interfaces for both scientific and technological purposes.

Theoretical, numerical, and experimental approaches are welcome and the topics of interest include, but are not limited to:
• Surface pattering and texturing
• Surface micro/nano-structuring
• Methods as laser surface modification, shot peening for micro and nano-attrition, etc for physical modification
• Coatings and thin films for superlubricity
• Thermochemical treatment for chemical element diffusion and plasma enhanced/assisted chemical vapor deposition and physical vapor deposition;
• Adhesion of coatings and thin films on vitreous, ceramic and metallic materials
• Ultra-hydrophobicity and Ultra-oleophobicity


Keywords: surface engineering, surface functionalization, energy efficiency, surface materials, superlubricity, ultra-hydrophobicity, Ultra-oleophobicity


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

04 February 2021 Abstract
07 June 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

04 February 2021 Abstract
07 June 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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