Research Topic

Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Nano-Architectures: Synthesis and Applications in Food and Water Quality Monitoring

About this Research Topic

Organic–inorganic hybrid architectures are formed by hybridization of organic and inorganic components, and have at least one component on nanometer scale. These are rapidly emerging and highly promising materials owing to their interesting characteristics, such as thermal and chemical stability, mechanical strength, improved electrical, and optical properties, etc. All of these properties arise from the synergy created by the hybrid interface, rather than contribution from individual components. The level of synergy, however, depends on the type of interactions involved as well as surface energy. The inorganic component can facilitate enhanced mechanical, chemical, and thermal stability and provide an interconnected porous network. This is advantageous in a myriad of applications including sensing and catalysis, and can contribute to the magnetic, electrochemical, and chemical properties. The organic component can act as a matrix for reactions, help in the formation of thin films and fibers, facilitate various structures with controlled porosity and connecting networks, and can provide hydrophilic or hydrophobic properties depending upon the requirement. These hybrid materials have been studied for a number of applications such as electroanalytics, solar cells, semiconductors, catalysts, biosensors, drug delivery and more.

Food and water quality monitoring are global concerns, with policy makers putting vast effort into imposing stringent guidelines regarding this issue. In spite of these attempts, food and water quality is deteriorating every day due to uncontrolled use of chemicals to increase production, shelf life and appearance; or due to increased discharge of industrial waste water, resulting from fast growing industrialization, household waste, and a number of other unreported methods and processes.

Organic-inorganic hybrid nano-architectures can help in developing accurate, precise, and economical analytical methods attributed to the presence of rich functional groups, improved chemical and physical properties, and good regeneration ability. Although many nanohybrids have been reported, the main challenge that still remains is the green, sustainable and economic synthesis of these materials for the targeted applications. Moreover, precise control over assembly and shape is another of the biggest challenges faced by researchers. Relatively low use of highly catalytic and biocompatible nanohybrids for environmental applications is one of the research gaps that needs to be addressed when proposing future technologies using hybrid nanostructures.

In this Research Topic, authors are welcome to submit their work covering synthesis of organic-inorganic hybrid architectures to investigate their potential application in food and water quality monitoring; including sensing of pollutants and contaminants, remediation of contaminants present in food and water matrices. Themes to be addressed include, but are not limited to:

  • Synthesis of novel organic-inorganic hybrid nano-architectures
  • Rational design of these nanomaterials for specific application as thin films, selective membranes, adsorbents, sensors and electrodes
  • Novel nano-biosensors for food and water quality monitoring
  • Development of conducting, non-conducting, and doped polymer (nano)composites for food quality assurance
  • Application of organic-inorganic nano-architectures in food quality monitoring addressing (1) microbial contamination, (2) food adulterants, and (3) food spoilage gases and toxins
  • Nanomaterials for water quality monitoring; detection, quantification and remediation, addressing (1) organic pollutants, (2) heavy metals, and (3) persistent pharmaceutical pollutants (PPP)


Keywords: organic-inorganic hybrid, nanomaterials, water quality, food quality, analytical methods


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Organic–inorganic hybrid architectures are formed by hybridization of organic and inorganic components, and have at least one component on nanometer scale. These are rapidly emerging and highly promising materials owing to their interesting characteristics, such as thermal and chemical stability, mechanical strength, improved electrical, and optical properties, etc. All of these properties arise from the synergy created by the hybrid interface, rather than contribution from individual components. The level of synergy, however, depends on the type of interactions involved as well as surface energy. The inorganic component can facilitate enhanced mechanical, chemical, and thermal stability and provide an interconnected porous network. This is advantageous in a myriad of applications including sensing and catalysis, and can contribute to the magnetic, electrochemical, and chemical properties. The organic component can act as a matrix for reactions, help in the formation of thin films and fibers, facilitate various structures with controlled porosity and connecting networks, and can provide hydrophilic or hydrophobic properties depending upon the requirement. These hybrid materials have been studied for a number of applications such as electroanalytics, solar cells, semiconductors, catalysts, biosensors, drug delivery and more.

Food and water quality monitoring are global concerns, with policy makers putting vast effort into imposing stringent guidelines regarding this issue. In spite of these attempts, food and water quality is deteriorating every day due to uncontrolled use of chemicals to increase production, shelf life and appearance; or due to increased discharge of industrial waste water, resulting from fast growing industrialization, household waste, and a number of other unreported methods and processes.

Organic-inorganic hybrid nano-architectures can help in developing accurate, precise, and economical analytical methods attributed to the presence of rich functional groups, improved chemical and physical properties, and good regeneration ability. Although many nanohybrids have been reported, the main challenge that still remains is the green, sustainable and economic synthesis of these materials for the targeted applications. Moreover, precise control over assembly and shape is another of the biggest challenges faced by researchers. Relatively low use of highly catalytic and biocompatible nanohybrids for environmental applications is one of the research gaps that needs to be addressed when proposing future technologies using hybrid nanostructures.

In this Research Topic, authors are welcome to submit their work covering synthesis of organic-inorganic hybrid architectures to investigate their potential application in food and water quality monitoring; including sensing of pollutants and contaminants, remediation of contaminants present in food and water matrices. Themes to be addressed include, but are not limited to:

  • Synthesis of novel organic-inorganic hybrid nano-architectures
  • Rational design of these nanomaterials for specific application as thin films, selective membranes, adsorbents, sensors and electrodes
  • Novel nano-biosensors for food and water quality monitoring
  • Development of conducting, non-conducting, and doped polymer (nano)composites for food quality assurance
  • Application of organic-inorganic nano-architectures in food quality monitoring addressing (1) microbial contamination, (2) food adulterants, and (3) food spoilage gases and toxins
  • Nanomaterials for water quality monitoring; detection, quantification and remediation, addressing (1) organic pollutants, (2) heavy metals, and (3) persistent pharmaceutical pollutants (PPP)


Keywords: organic-inorganic hybrid, nanomaterials, water quality, food quality, analytical methods


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

11 January 2021 Abstract
10 May 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

11 January 2021 Abstract
10 May 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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