Research Topic

New Players in Mitotic Progression: Focus on Lysosomes and Autophagy

About this Research Topic

Mitotic cell division is a vital part of human development and tissue maintenance. Cancer cells are often both highly proliferative and prone to a high rate of errors during mitosis, also known as chromosomal instability (CIN). CIN creates a variety of genomic abnormalities (including aneuploidy and chromothripsis) which drive tumor cell evolution. Subsequently, the study of mitosis is closely linked to cancer research. To prevent CIN, the stages of mitosis in healthy somatic cells are carefully regulated; both spatially and temporally. The principal actor implicated in the degradation of mitotic factors is the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) that leads to a rapid and sequential inactivation of regulatory proteins – allowing for regulated progression through mitosis. Interestingly, the involvement of the other cellular degradative system, aka the lysosomes, in regulating mitotic progression remains a controversial topic.

Although it is well accepted that CIN results from chromosome mis-segregation, the molecular mechanisms responsible for chromosome mis-segregation are not fully understood. Proper chromosome segregation leading to the formation of two new, genetically identical cells relies on a complex series of steps including, but not limited to, chromatin compaction, nuclear envelope breakdown, centrosome positioning, chromatin-microtubule attachment, sister chromatid separation and segregation, nuclear envelop reformation and cytokinesis. These steps are highly controlled, including by the temporally regulated degradation of mitotic proteins. Historically, the role of lysosomes and autophagy in this process has been often overlooked by the scientific community. However, recent reports have revealed an active function for lysosomes in mitotic progression, and especially in chromosome segregation, while other studies emphasized the importance of shutting-down autophagy to prevent deleterious degradation of the genetic material.

The aim of this Research Topic is to promote recent and novel research studies about the interconnection between two influential fields in cell biology: autophagy and mitosis. Given the importance of mitosis in cancer, bringing to light this burgeoning research area should be of great interest to the cell biology and cancer research communities.

We welcome Original Research articles. Opinions and Reviews should be discussed with the topic editors before submission. Areas to be covered in this Research Topic may include, but are not limited to:
• Cellular mechanisms driving chromosomal instability
• Micronucleus formation and fate
• Signaling pathways regulating mitosis and autophagy
• Autophagy status in mitosis in different organisms
• Regulation of centrosome and spindle apparatus organization
• Interplay between proteasome- and lysosome-dependent degradation in mitosis
• Selective autophagy in mitosis
• Molecular motors or cytoskeletal control in mitosis and autophagy
• DNA damage and mitosis
• Telomere regulation during mitosis


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Mitotic cell division is a vital part of human development and tissue maintenance. Cancer cells are often both highly proliferative and prone to a high rate of errors during mitosis, also known as chromosomal instability (CIN). CIN creates a variety of genomic abnormalities (including aneuploidy and chromothripsis) which drive tumor cell evolution. Subsequently, the study of mitosis is closely linked to cancer research. To prevent CIN, the stages of mitosis in healthy somatic cells are carefully regulated; both spatially and temporally. The principal actor implicated in the degradation of mitotic factors is the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) that leads to a rapid and sequential inactivation of regulatory proteins – allowing for regulated progression through mitosis. Interestingly, the involvement of the other cellular degradative system, aka the lysosomes, in regulating mitotic progression remains a controversial topic.

Although it is well accepted that CIN results from chromosome mis-segregation, the molecular mechanisms responsible for chromosome mis-segregation are not fully understood. Proper chromosome segregation leading to the formation of two new, genetically identical cells relies on a complex series of steps including, but not limited to, chromatin compaction, nuclear envelope breakdown, centrosome positioning, chromatin-microtubule attachment, sister chromatid separation and segregation, nuclear envelop reformation and cytokinesis. These steps are highly controlled, including by the temporally regulated degradation of mitotic proteins. Historically, the role of lysosomes and autophagy in this process has been often overlooked by the scientific community. However, recent reports have revealed an active function for lysosomes in mitotic progression, and especially in chromosome segregation, while other studies emphasized the importance of shutting-down autophagy to prevent deleterious degradation of the genetic material.

The aim of this Research Topic is to promote recent and novel research studies about the interconnection between two influential fields in cell biology: autophagy and mitosis. Given the importance of mitosis in cancer, bringing to light this burgeoning research area should be of great interest to the cell biology and cancer research communities.

We welcome Original Research articles. Opinions and Reviews should be discussed with the topic editors before submission. Areas to be covered in this Research Topic may include, but are not limited to:
• Cellular mechanisms driving chromosomal instability
• Micronucleus formation and fate
• Signaling pathways regulating mitosis and autophagy
• Autophagy status in mitosis in different organisms
• Regulation of centrosome and spindle apparatus organization
• Interplay between proteasome- and lysosome-dependent degradation in mitosis
• Selective autophagy in mitosis
• Molecular motors or cytoskeletal control in mitosis and autophagy
• DNA damage and mitosis
• Telomere regulation during mitosis


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

03 March 2021 Abstract
12 May 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

03 March 2021 Abstract
12 May 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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