Research Topic

Wearable Assisted Rehabilitation and Telerehabilitation for Treatment of Acute and Chronic Neurologic Disorder

About this Research Topic

Wearable sensors have been gaining popularity in the literature particularly as a means for providing more objective measures of mobility, gait, and balance. Research suggests that wearable sensors for assessment of mobility in people with neurologic disorders may provide more objective and more granular information on how a person is progressing or declining. Less attention has been focused on the use of wearable technology for rehabilitation interventions. Laboratory studies have shown evidence that wearable technology has the potential for providing real-time, closed-loop feedback during gait, balance, and vestibular rehabilitation, allowing for ‘precision rehabilitation’ (interventions specifically targeted to the unique characteristics of each individual). The closed-loop system allows for sensory information about motor performance, that would otherwise be unknown to patients in real-time. However, it is relatively unknown if this technology is effective in the long-term or whether, if delivered during rehabilitation, would increase the effectiveness of therapy. Furthermore, although the trend in telerehabilitation started many years ago, there has been an exponentially increased interest in the past 6 months with the COVID-19 pandemic. Monitoring changes in motor activity with wearable technology during telerehabilitation presents many potential benefits to both parties, allowing physical therapists to monitor changes objectively and in real-time and to the individuals receiving personalized rehabilitation.

The goal of this Research Topic is to explore the role wearable technology could play in rehabilitation treatment, beyond the documented advantages wearables may play in improving assessment of mobility, gait, and balance in neurologic populations. It is unknown if adopting wearable technology into the clinic is feasible and advantageous. Apart from a few studies, it is also unknown if there is added benefit to real-time, closed-loop feedback versus typical feedback such as cueing, particularly in the long-term. Finally, it is unclear what the pros and cons are to adding such technology to rehabilitation treatment. Ultimately, we would like to explore the pros and cons of the use of wearable technology in telerehabilitation.

Potential submission can be original research papers or review articles. Topics could include, but are not limited to:
• Wearable sensors for real-time feedback for neurologic rehabilitation
• What is the added value of using wearable sensors for rehabilitation?
• How wearable sensors could enhance telerehabilitation
• Pros and cons of wearable sensors for telerehabilitation


Keywords: Wearable Sensors, Rehabilitation, Neurologic Disease, Tele-Rehabilitation


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Wearable sensors have been gaining popularity in the literature particularly as a means for providing more objective measures of mobility, gait, and balance. Research suggests that wearable sensors for assessment of mobility in people with neurologic disorders may provide more objective and more granular information on how a person is progressing or declining. Less attention has been focused on the use of wearable technology for rehabilitation interventions. Laboratory studies have shown evidence that wearable technology has the potential for providing real-time, closed-loop feedback during gait, balance, and vestibular rehabilitation, allowing for ‘precision rehabilitation’ (interventions specifically targeted to the unique characteristics of each individual). The closed-loop system allows for sensory information about motor performance, that would otherwise be unknown to patients in real-time. However, it is relatively unknown if this technology is effective in the long-term or whether, if delivered during rehabilitation, would increase the effectiveness of therapy. Furthermore, although the trend in telerehabilitation started many years ago, there has been an exponentially increased interest in the past 6 months with the COVID-19 pandemic. Monitoring changes in motor activity with wearable technology during telerehabilitation presents many potential benefits to both parties, allowing physical therapists to monitor changes objectively and in real-time and to the individuals receiving personalized rehabilitation.

The goal of this Research Topic is to explore the role wearable technology could play in rehabilitation treatment, beyond the documented advantages wearables may play in improving assessment of mobility, gait, and balance in neurologic populations. It is unknown if adopting wearable technology into the clinic is feasible and advantageous. Apart from a few studies, it is also unknown if there is added benefit to real-time, closed-loop feedback versus typical feedback such as cueing, particularly in the long-term. Finally, it is unclear what the pros and cons are to adding such technology to rehabilitation treatment. Ultimately, we would like to explore the pros and cons of the use of wearable technology in telerehabilitation.

Potential submission can be original research papers or review articles. Topics could include, but are not limited to:
• Wearable sensors for real-time feedback for neurologic rehabilitation
• What is the added value of using wearable sensors for rehabilitation?
• How wearable sensors could enhance telerehabilitation
• Pros and cons of wearable sensors for telerehabilitation


Keywords: Wearable Sensors, Rehabilitation, Neurologic Disease, Tele-Rehabilitation


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

17 January 2021 Abstract
16 May 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

17 January 2021 Abstract
16 May 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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