Research Topic

Hybrid Materials and Systems for Green Energy Storage

About this Research Topic

In the quest for green alternatives to lithium ion batteries, hybrid metal ion batteries (HMIBs) have been proposed, since they combine the advantages of two different charge carriers in terms of energy density and safety. Further enhancement in the energy density can be achieved with hybrid supercapacitors (HSs) that store the energy via two dissimilar mechanisms (i.e. capacitive and faradaic). Notwithstanding the attractiveness of the HMIBs and HSs as energy storage systems, their performance is still far from the desired. Based on the previous experience on lithium ion batteries, several experimental and theoretical approaches have been undertaken to improve the performance of the HMIBs and HSs, but none of them is sufficient to make a breakthrough.

The effectiveness of both HMIBs and HSs depends critically on the rational selection of electrode and electrolyte materials, as well as the compatibility between them. Therefore, this special issue will focus on hybrid materials and systems for green energy storage. The physicochemical characterization of electrode and electrolyte materials upon cycling is an important step to understand the mechanism of energy storage by both HMIBs and HSs. The computational techniques can unveil the nature of the processes occurring in the devices and the factors they depend on, thus allowing control and tuning of the performance of the existing materials, as well as the modelling of novel ones.

The submission of original research articles, short communications and review articles are encouraged. The Research Topic covers the following themes:
• Hybrid metal ion batteries: electrode materials, aqueous and non-aqueous electrolytes;
• Dual-Ion intercalation reactions for energy storage;
• Hybrid supercapacitors: electrochemical reactions for energy storage;
• Electrode/electrolyte interface in hybrid energy storage systems;
• Hybrid energy storage systems: in-situ, ex-situ and/or post-mortem analysis;
• Modelling of hybrid metal ion batteries: design of electrode and electrolyte materials and simulation of processes they participate in.


Keywords: post-lithium ion batteries, supercapacitors, intercalation, electrode/electrolyte interface, modelling


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

In the quest for green alternatives to lithium ion batteries, hybrid metal ion batteries (HMIBs) have been proposed, since they combine the advantages of two different charge carriers in terms of energy density and safety. Further enhancement in the energy density can be achieved with hybrid supercapacitors (HSs) that store the energy via two dissimilar mechanisms (i.e. capacitive and faradaic). Notwithstanding the attractiveness of the HMIBs and HSs as energy storage systems, their performance is still far from the desired. Based on the previous experience on lithium ion batteries, several experimental and theoretical approaches have been undertaken to improve the performance of the HMIBs and HSs, but none of them is sufficient to make a breakthrough.

The effectiveness of both HMIBs and HSs depends critically on the rational selection of electrode and electrolyte materials, as well as the compatibility between them. Therefore, this special issue will focus on hybrid materials and systems for green energy storage. The physicochemical characterization of electrode and electrolyte materials upon cycling is an important step to understand the mechanism of energy storage by both HMIBs and HSs. The computational techniques can unveil the nature of the processes occurring in the devices and the factors they depend on, thus allowing control and tuning of the performance of the existing materials, as well as the modelling of novel ones.

The submission of original research articles, short communications and review articles are encouraged. The Research Topic covers the following themes:
• Hybrid metal ion batteries: electrode materials, aqueous and non-aqueous electrolytes;
• Dual-Ion intercalation reactions for energy storage;
• Hybrid supercapacitors: electrochemical reactions for energy storage;
• Electrode/electrolyte interface in hybrid energy storage systems;
• Hybrid energy storage systems: in-situ, ex-situ and/or post-mortem analysis;
• Modelling of hybrid metal ion batteries: design of electrode and electrolyte materials and simulation of processes they participate in.


Keywords: post-lithium ion batteries, supercapacitors, intercalation, electrode/electrolyte interface, modelling


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

15 February 2021 Abstract
04 July 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

15 February 2021 Abstract
04 July 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..