Research Topic

Hearing Loss: Mechanisms and Prevention

About this Research Topic

Hearing loss is the most common sensory disorder that affects about 466 million people of all ages all over the world. Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is the most common type of hearing loss. Various stress and injury could lead to the SNHL, including genetic factors, acoustic trauma, noise exposure, ototoxic drugs, inflammation or ageing. The irreversible loss of sensory hair cells and the following degeneration of spiral ganglion neurons are the main cause of SNHL. SNHL is not yet curable in the clinic because of the irreversible death of hair cells and the degeneration of spiral ganglion neurons in the cochlea.

Recent years, exciting animal studies on signalling pathway manipulation, gene therapy, and stem cell transplantation as well as pharmaceutical agents demonstrated that hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons could be regenerated and indicated that hearing loss might eventually be curable in the future. This Research Topic will focus on recent advances in the mechanism and prevention of hearing loss.

In this Research Topic, we invite authors to submit high-quality original research articles and reviews. Researchers and clinicians are encouraged to submit their work including basic research, clinical research and translational research. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

• Gene therapy of hearing loss
• Hair cell and spiral ganglion neuron regeneration
• Spiral ganglion neuron refinement and retraction
• Application of bio-materials in improving the plasticity of spiral ganglion neuron


Keywords: hearing, cochlea, inner ear, hair cell, spiral ganglion neuron


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Hearing loss is the most common sensory disorder that affects about 466 million people of all ages all over the world. Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is the most common type of hearing loss. Various stress and injury could lead to the SNHL, including genetic factors, acoustic trauma, noise exposure, ototoxic drugs, inflammation or ageing. The irreversible loss of sensory hair cells and the following degeneration of spiral ganglion neurons are the main cause of SNHL. SNHL is not yet curable in the clinic because of the irreversible death of hair cells and the degeneration of spiral ganglion neurons in the cochlea.

Recent years, exciting animal studies on signalling pathway manipulation, gene therapy, and stem cell transplantation as well as pharmaceutical agents demonstrated that hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons could be regenerated and indicated that hearing loss might eventually be curable in the future. This Research Topic will focus on recent advances in the mechanism and prevention of hearing loss.

In this Research Topic, we invite authors to submit high-quality original research articles and reviews. Researchers and clinicians are encouraged to submit their work including basic research, clinical research and translational research. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

• Gene therapy of hearing loss
• Hair cell and spiral ganglion neuron regeneration
• Spiral ganglion neuron refinement and retraction
• Application of bio-materials in improving the plasticity of spiral ganglion neuron


Keywords: hearing, cochlea, inner ear, hair cell, spiral ganglion neuron


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

31 March 2021 Abstract
31 July 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

31 March 2021 Abstract
31 July 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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