Research Topic

Emotional Gesturing in Social Robots

About this Research Topic

Body language in social robots is essential to convey naturalness and ease interaction; in short, to make them trustworthy. Human-like robots are more appropriate to imitate human gesticulation behavior, especially when it alludes to talking gesture generation.

Gesticulating while talking is innate in humans, and is more common in certain cultures. Speech is often accompanied by moving the head, nodding, and orienting the gaze. Particularly involved is the motion of the arms and the hands.

While some gestures, such as beat ones, are used without particular meaning, others can be used to convey different information, emphasize what people are saying, point out something, and to communicate emotions. The gestures can be unintended or intentional, with the latter often revealing aspects related to personality and mood. Emotions cause a series of changes that can also be noticeable in postures and gestures.

We naturally produce these rich gestures spontaneously without effort, however, to obtain an automatic generation of gestures in robots, there are several issues that must be tackled.

This Research Topic aims to gain a better understanding of emotional gesturing in robotics by exploring how natural gesticulation is generated in social robots and the types of training and input data required to generate a variety of gestures. We also aim to identify which features of emotional gestures should be emphasised in order to accurately represent the speaker's emotion and/or tone.

Aside from co-speech gestures, body motion is also present in humans even when listening or thinking, therefore, we also seek to assess whether robots should also replicate these gestures to improve social experiences.

It is also important to develop methods for robustly and objectively evaluating these kinds of behaviors. The produced gesturing motion should be perceived as natural and acceptable by the general audience. Notwithstanding, the lack of proper quantitative measures makes it impossible to compare multiple systems. Hence, we also consider any proposals for methods of objectively evaluating gesturing systems.

This Research Topic explores themes including, but not limited to:

• Human-like gesticulation in social robots
• Gestures generation
• Co-speech gesturing systems
• Multimodal expression of emotions
• Affective models for gesture generation
• Methodologies for evaluating robotic gestures
• Quantitative Measures for the evaluation of not verbal human-robot interaction
• Context-based gesticulation
• Gestures classification
• Creation of dataset for multimodal human-robot interaction
• Real-time gesture Imitation
• Gesture learning
• Non-verbal interaction
• Computational creativity for gesture generation
• Social models for multimodal human-robot interaction


Keywords: Human-like gesticulation, Social Robots, Robot Gesticulation, Human-Robot Interaction, Humanoid Robots


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Body language in social robots is essential to convey naturalness and ease interaction; in short, to make them trustworthy. Human-like robots are more appropriate to imitate human gesticulation behavior, especially when it alludes to talking gesture generation.

Gesticulating while talking is innate in humans, and is more common in certain cultures. Speech is often accompanied by moving the head, nodding, and orienting the gaze. Particularly involved is the motion of the arms and the hands.

While some gestures, such as beat ones, are used without particular meaning, others can be used to convey different information, emphasize what people are saying, point out something, and to communicate emotions. The gestures can be unintended or intentional, with the latter often revealing aspects related to personality and mood. Emotions cause a series of changes that can also be noticeable in postures and gestures.

We naturally produce these rich gestures spontaneously without effort, however, to obtain an automatic generation of gestures in robots, there are several issues that must be tackled.

This Research Topic aims to gain a better understanding of emotional gesturing in robotics by exploring how natural gesticulation is generated in social robots and the types of training and input data required to generate a variety of gestures. We also aim to identify which features of emotional gestures should be emphasised in order to accurately represent the speaker's emotion and/or tone.

Aside from co-speech gestures, body motion is also present in humans even when listening or thinking, therefore, we also seek to assess whether robots should also replicate these gestures to improve social experiences.

It is also important to develop methods for robustly and objectively evaluating these kinds of behaviors. The produced gesturing motion should be perceived as natural and acceptable by the general audience. Notwithstanding, the lack of proper quantitative measures makes it impossible to compare multiple systems. Hence, we also consider any proposals for methods of objectively evaluating gesturing systems.

This Research Topic explores themes including, but not limited to:

• Human-like gesticulation in social robots
• Gestures generation
• Co-speech gesturing systems
• Multimodal expression of emotions
• Affective models for gesture generation
• Methodologies for evaluating robotic gestures
• Quantitative Measures for the evaluation of not verbal human-robot interaction
• Context-based gesticulation
• Gestures classification
• Creation of dataset for multimodal human-robot interaction
• Real-time gesture Imitation
• Gesture learning
• Non-verbal interaction
• Computational creativity for gesture generation
• Social models for multimodal human-robot interaction


Keywords: Human-like gesticulation, Social Robots, Robot Gesticulation, Human-Robot Interaction, Humanoid Robots


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

25 June 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

25 June 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..