Research Topic

Novel Halide Perovskite-Based Composites with Improved Structural, Optoelectronic, and Operational Performance for Energy Applications

About this Research Topic

Halide perovskite (HP) materials have emerged as extremely appealing materials for photovoltaic application, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), light amplifier, photodetectors or lasers, and in general for all the form of sustainable energy. HPs are easily synthesized by several methods (solution, evaporation, ink-jet printing…) with interesting implications for industrial production. Moreover, their versatile synthesis and tolerance to electronic defects facilitate the combination of HPs with other materials (organic additives, polymers, inorganic quantum dots…), leading to synergetic positive effects. Perovskite solar cells are typically based on materials with a 3D crystal structure. More recently, perovskites with reduced dimensionality (nanocrystals 0D, nanowires 1D, nanoplatelets 2D) have become popular in the field due to their exceptional photophysical properties, which make them ideal candidates for light emission. Moreover, the combination of different dimensionality, especially 2D/3D perovskite improves the charge injection in quasi 2D PeLEDs and stabilizes the solar cells due to the 2D capping layer which acts as a passivating interlayer.

Recent advances in the field indicate a bright future in the areas of photovoltaic and displays. However, some challenges need to be addressed, to reduce the material toxicity and to increase the stability of the material and devices. In the area of electronic and photonic materials, the combination of materials (core-shell, heterostructures, etc) is a well-established strategy to improve mechanical, morphological, and photophysical properties. This is an inspiration for perovskites and in recent years several breakthroughs have been published in the field. In this frame, the composition of the perovskite, with internal or external additives, have been proven to minimize defects (maximize radiative recombination) along to stabilize the photoactive phase, resulting in efficient devices with longer lifetimes. One example is the epitaxial growth by embedding inorganic quantum dots resulting in improved stability of the solar cells, and balanced energy transfer in the LEDs. The advantage of using organic or QDs additive lies in the necessity to preserve the band-gap of the material, especially for the perovskite with a low band-gap to ensure a pure emission in the IR region or an improved light-harvesting, in the case of the solar cells. Despite the band-gap does not change, the crystalline and emission properties are affected, due to difference in the crystalline domains and morphologies. The same happens if the metal, commonly the lead, is partially or totally replaced with a less toxic one (like Sr, Bi, Sn…). Thus there is a lot of room for “composites” addressed to control the optoelectronic and structural properties of the perovskite materials towards improved devices for energy application.

The current Research Topic will cover recent advances in the design, synthesis, characterization, and applications of composites in which a novel combination of perovskites and other energy materials results in a synergetic beneficial effect. Areas to be covered in this Research Topic may include, but are not limited to:

• Device Stability by stabilization of the active layer or interface engineering;
• Quantum dot in perovskite matrix for the epitaxial growth of the metastable perovskite active phase
• Crystalline and structural characterization of perovskite and perovskite/additive nanocomposite;
• Advanced optoelectronic characterization by photoluminescence spectroscopy;
• Inorganic or perovskite QDs synthesis, characterization, and application.


Keywords: solar cells, LEDs, perovskite, quantum dot


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Halide perovskite (HP) materials have emerged as extremely appealing materials for photovoltaic application, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), light amplifier, photodetectors or lasers, and in general for all the form of sustainable energy. HPs are easily synthesized by several methods (solution, evaporation, ink-jet printing…) with interesting implications for industrial production. Moreover, their versatile synthesis and tolerance to electronic defects facilitate the combination of HPs with other materials (organic additives, polymers, inorganic quantum dots…), leading to synergetic positive effects. Perovskite solar cells are typically based on materials with a 3D crystal structure. More recently, perovskites with reduced dimensionality (nanocrystals 0D, nanowires 1D, nanoplatelets 2D) have become popular in the field due to their exceptional photophysical properties, which make them ideal candidates for light emission. Moreover, the combination of different dimensionality, especially 2D/3D perovskite improves the charge injection in quasi 2D PeLEDs and stabilizes the solar cells due to the 2D capping layer which acts as a passivating interlayer.

Recent advances in the field indicate a bright future in the areas of photovoltaic and displays. However, some challenges need to be addressed, to reduce the material toxicity and to increase the stability of the material and devices. In the area of electronic and photonic materials, the combination of materials (core-shell, heterostructures, etc) is a well-established strategy to improve mechanical, morphological, and photophysical properties. This is an inspiration for perovskites and in recent years several breakthroughs have been published in the field. In this frame, the composition of the perovskite, with internal or external additives, have been proven to minimize defects (maximize radiative recombination) along to stabilize the photoactive phase, resulting in efficient devices with longer lifetimes. One example is the epitaxial growth by embedding inorganic quantum dots resulting in improved stability of the solar cells, and balanced energy transfer in the LEDs. The advantage of using organic or QDs additive lies in the necessity to preserve the band-gap of the material, especially for the perovskite with a low band-gap to ensure a pure emission in the IR region or an improved light-harvesting, in the case of the solar cells. Despite the band-gap does not change, the crystalline and emission properties are affected, due to difference in the crystalline domains and morphologies. The same happens if the metal, commonly the lead, is partially or totally replaced with a less toxic one (like Sr, Bi, Sn…). Thus there is a lot of room for “composites” addressed to control the optoelectronic and structural properties of the perovskite materials towards improved devices for energy application.

The current Research Topic will cover recent advances in the design, synthesis, characterization, and applications of composites in which a novel combination of perovskites and other energy materials results in a synergetic beneficial effect. Areas to be covered in this Research Topic may include, but are not limited to:

• Device Stability by stabilization of the active layer or interface engineering;
• Quantum dot in perovskite matrix for the epitaxial growth of the metastable perovskite active phase
• Crystalline and structural characterization of perovskite and perovskite/additive nanocomposite;
• Advanced optoelectronic characterization by photoluminescence spectroscopy;
• Inorganic or perovskite QDs synthesis, characterization, and application.


Keywords: solar cells, LEDs, perovskite, quantum dot


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

30 June 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

30 June 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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