Research Topic

Association Between Periodontal Disease and Metabolic Disorders

About this Research Topic

The association between periodontal disease and metabolic disorders (obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, dyslipidemia) is well established. Less understood is the causal relationship between metabolic disorders and periodontal disease. Cross-sectional and longitudinal studies have shown that periodontal disease and some metabolic disorders are risk factors to one another. The keystone-pathogen hypothesis holds that the administration of a specific pathogen can transform the health associated (symbiotic) microbiome to a disease-causing (dysbiotic) state despite a low level of colonization. Interestingly, administration of periodontal pathogens in rodent models was found to alter the composition of the gut microbiome from health to disease that resulted in impaired gut barrier function, endotoxemia, and inflammation of the liver and adipose tissue. This led to the suggestion that the link between periodontitis and obesity is largely based on the oral cavity-gut microbiome connection. However, the mechanistic links of dysbiotic microbiomes, dysregulated immunity and inflammation are yet to be elucidated.


The goal of this Research Topic is to emphasize research on the association between periodontal disease and metabolic disorders mainly obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and dyslipidemia. We will consider manuscripts of original research articles, reviews, mini-reviews, opinion, hypotheses, theories, perspectives and case studies.


Topics include but are not limited to:

·      Common risk factors of periodontal disease and metabolic disorders

·      Roles of dysbiotic oral and/or gut microbiome or specific bacteria, fungi, or viruses

·      Mechanistic relationship of common immune and/or inflammatory mediators (cytokines, chemokines, other molecules) 

·      Mechanistic studies addressing the role of microbiomes or specific microbes in the bi-directional relationship

·      Diagnostics or therapeutical strategies that modulate the dysbiotic microbiome


Dr Camille Zenobia is a Medical Science Liaison at Syneos Health, USA. All other Topic Editors declare no competing interests in relation to the subject of this Research Topic


Keywords: Periodontal disease, metabolic disorders, dysbiotic microbiome, inflammation


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The association between periodontal disease and metabolic disorders (obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, dyslipidemia) is well established. Less understood is the causal relationship between metabolic disorders and periodontal disease. Cross-sectional and longitudinal studies have shown that periodontal disease and some metabolic disorders are risk factors to one another. The keystone-pathogen hypothesis holds that the administration of a specific pathogen can transform the health associated (symbiotic) microbiome to a disease-causing (dysbiotic) state despite a low level of colonization. Interestingly, administration of periodontal pathogens in rodent models was found to alter the composition of the gut microbiome from health to disease that resulted in impaired gut barrier function, endotoxemia, and inflammation of the liver and adipose tissue. This led to the suggestion that the link between periodontitis and obesity is largely based on the oral cavity-gut microbiome connection. However, the mechanistic links of dysbiotic microbiomes, dysregulated immunity and inflammation are yet to be elucidated.


The goal of this Research Topic is to emphasize research on the association between periodontal disease and metabolic disorders mainly obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and dyslipidemia. We will consider manuscripts of original research articles, reviews, mini-reviews, opinion, hypotheses, theories, perspectives and case studies.


Topics include but are not limited to:

·      Common risk factors of periodontal disease and metabolic disorders

·      Roles of dysbiotic oral and/or gut microbiome or specific bacteria, fungi, or viruses

·      Mechanistic relationship of common immune and/or inflammatory mediators (cytokines, chemokines, other molecules) 

·      Mechanistic studies addressing the role of microbiomes or specific microbes in the bi-directional relationship

·      Diagnostics or therapeutical strategies that modulate the dysbiotic microbiome


Dr Camille Zenobia is a Medical Science Liaison at Syneos Health, USA. All other Topic Editors declare no competing interests in relation to the subject of this Research Topic


Keywords: Periodontal disease, metabolic disorders, dysbiotic microbiome, inflammation


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

31 May 2021 Abstract
30 September 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

31 May 2021 Abstract
30 September 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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