Research Topic

(Bio)Advanced Materials and Devices in Energy Storage Systems

About this Research Topic

Superior energy storage devices to meet basic requirements of human life are in great demand. Advanced materials may represent the solution to achieve desired properties and characteristics of storage systems that so far have not been possible by conventional industrial processes. Accordingly, researchers have taken a new approach to obtain materials with different capabilities and applications. These materials, which are obtained using modern production methods of directional engineering operations, will have superior properties in terms of density, strength, conductivity, porosity, deformability, modulus of elasticity, etc. The enhanced (bio)materials and composites applied in energy storage device include hydrogels, porous carbon structures, polymeric materials and organic liquid electrolytes.


This present Research Topic focuses on the tailoring and synthesis of advanced materials suitable for energy storage, as well as design of devices for energy storage. The biomaterials and devices should have novel structures or present new mechanisms that improve energy storage, such as supercapacitors and batteries. Green synthesis route, facilitating electron transfer, availability of the components, low production cost along with mild condition, and higher energy density and better safety than present materials could be considered as the main characteristics of desirable advanced materials. Furthermore, the prepared energy storage devices should exhibit better functionalities than the available devices. Key problems in the fabrication of the optimized energy storage devices for a specific application are also highly welcomed.


We invite submissions of original research articles and reviews related (but not limited to) the following topics:

• Advanced materials for supercapacitors

• High-capacity hydrogen storage materials

• Advanced materials for CO2 capture and utilization

• Electrode materials and electrolyte materials for solid-state batteries

• Advanced materials for low-temperature fuel cells and electrolyzer cells

• Nanostructured materials for thin-film solar cells and optoelectronic devices

• Organic and inorganic phase change materials for solar energy storage



Keywords: Energy Storage Devices, (Bio)materials and Composites, Green Synthesis


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Superior energy storage devices to meet basic requirements of human life are in great demand. Advanced materials may represent the solution to achieve desired properties and characteristics of storage systems that so far have not been possible by conventional industrial processes. Accordingly, researchers have taken a new approach to obtain materials with different capabilities and applications. These materials, which are obtained using modern production methods of directional engineering operations, will have superior properties in terms of density, strength, conductivity, porosity, deformability, modulus of elasticity, etc. The enhanced (bio)materials and composites applied in energy storage device include hydrogels, porous carbon structures, polymeric materials and organic liquid electrolytes.


This present Research Topic focuses on the tailoring and synthesis of advanced materials suitable for energy storage, as well as design of devices for energy storage. The biomaterials and devices should have novel structures or present new mechanisms that improve energy storage, such as supercapacitors and batteries. Green synthesis route, facilitating electron transfer, availability of the components, low production cost along with mild condition, and higher energy density and better safety than present materials could be considered as the main characteristics of desirable advanced materials. Furthermore, the prepared energy storage devices should exhibit better functionalities than the available devices. Key problems in the fabrication of the optimized energy storage devices for a specific application are also highly welcomed.


We invite submissions of original research articles and reviews related (but not limited to) the following topics:

• Advanced materials for supercapacitors

• High-capacity hydrogen storage materials

• Advanced materials for CO2 capture and utilization

• Electrode materials and electrolyte materials for solid-state batteries

• Advanced materials for low-temperature fuel cells and electrolyzer cells

• Nanostructured materials for thin-film solar cells and optoelectronic devices

• Organic and inorganic phase change materials for solar energy storage



Keywords: Energy Storage Devices, (Bio)materials and Composites, Green Synthesis


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

18 July 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

18 July 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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