Research Topic

Plant Growth Regulators in Abiotic Stress Management of Crop Plants: The Current Scenario

About this Research Topic

Plants are continuously exposed to abiotic stresses such as drought, salinity, suboptimal temperatures (heat, cold, and freezing), nutrient deficiency, and mineral toxicity. Climate change and the deteriorating ecosystems indicate that abiotic stresses will continue to threaten food security. Abiotic stresses disrupt essential metabolic and signaling pathways, limiting plant growth, development, and productivity. It is therefore imperative that novel management strategies to enhance abiotic stress tolerance in plants are developed based on a good understanding of plant stress responses and how these interface and integrate with growth responses.

Plant Growth Regulators (PGRs), traditionally accepted as phytohormones (auxins, cytokinins, gibberellins, abscisic acid, ethylene, salicylic acid, jasmonates, and brassinosteroids), are a diverse class of chemicals that act at very low concentrations to control plant growth and development as well as stress responses. Endogenous phytohormones play a vital role in adaptation to various environments by activating signal transduction pathways which culminate in the induction of genes, proteins, and metabolites important for stress tolerance. Synthetic phytohormones as PGRs have been used in agriculture for decades. The move towards sustainable management practices and growing trends towards organic farming, backyard gardening, and indoor farming will fuel the PGRs market in the coming years.

The aim of this Research Topic is to publish articles on abiotic stress management in crop plants by hormonal and non-hormonal PGRs, while also providing an insight into the molecular, biochemical, and physiological mechanisms that underpin the stress responses. Specific topics include, but are not limited to:

• Seed priming with PGRs for abiotic stress tolerance
• PGRs as biostimulants for abiotic stress tolerance
• Metabolic engineering of phytohormones for abiotic stress tolerance
• Phytohormone targets in crop breeding for abiotic stress tolerance
• Traditional PGRs for improving crop abiotic stress tolerance
• Non-traditional PGRs for improving crop abiotic stress tolerance
• Enhancement of stress tolerance in plants by hormone producing rhizobacteria
• Molecular mechanisms underlying PGR-mediated induction of abiotic stress tolerance
• Market opportunities and trends for PGRs


Keywords: Abiotic Stress, Brassinosteroids, Auxins, Ethylene, Jasmonic Acid, Salicylic Acid, Molecular Aspects


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Plants are continuously exposed to abiotic stresses such as drought, salinity, suboptimal temperatures (heat, cold, and freezing), nutrient deficiency, and mineral toxicity. Climate change and the deteriorating ecosystems indicate that abiotic stresses will continue to threaten food security. Abiotic stresses disrupt essential metabolic and signaling pathways, limiting plant growth, development, and productivity. It is therefore imperative that novel management strategies to enhance abiotic stress tolerance in plants are developed based on a good understanding of plant stress responses and how these interface and integrate with growth responses.

Plant Growth Regulators (PGRs), traditionally accepted as phytohormones (auxins, cytokinins, gibberellins, abscisic acid, ethylene, salicylic acid, jasmonates, and brassinosteroids), are a diverse class of chemicals that act at very low concentrations to control plant growth and development as well as stress responses. Endogenous phytohormones play a vital role in adaptation to various environments by activating signal transduction pathways which culminate in the induction of genes, proteins, and metabolites important for stress tolerance. Synthetic phytohormones as PGRs have been used in agriculture for decades. The move towards sustainable management practices and growing trends towards organic farming, backyard gardening, and indoor farming will fuel the PGRs market in the coming years.

The aim of this Research Topic is to publish articles on abiotic stress management in crop plants by hormonal and non-hormonal PGRs, while also providing an insight into the molecular, biochemical, and physiological mechanisms that underpin the stress responses. Specific topics include, but are not limited to:

• Seed priming with PGRs for abiotic stress tolerance
• PGRs as biostimulants for abiotic stress tolerance
• Metabolic engineering of phytohormones for abiotic stress tolerance
• Phytohormone targets in crop breeding for abiotic stress tolerance
• Traditional PGRs for improving crop abiotic stress tolerance
• Non-traditional PGRs for improving crop abiotic stress tolerance
• Enhancement of stress tolerance in plants by hormone producing rhizobacteria
• Molecular mechanisms underlying PGR-mediated induction of abiotic stress tolerance
• Market opportunities and trends for PGRs


Keywords: Abiotic Stress, Brassinosteroids, Auxins, Ethylene, Jasmonic Acid, Salicylic Acid, Molecular Aspects


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

31 May 2021 Abstract
30 September 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

31 May 2021 Abstract
30 September 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..