Research Topic

Functional Neuroimaging, Neuromodulation and Neurofeedback: New Frontiers in Seizure Disorders

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The concept of neural plasticity has led to investigation into advanced techniques for altering brain activity in a therapeutic direction. This has started with approaches like cognitive rehabilitation and occupational and speech therapies and has now advanced towards more advanced strategies. These have ...

The concept of neural plasticity has led to investigation into advanced techniques for altering brain activity in a therapeutic direction. This has started with approaches like cognitive rehabilitation and occupational and speech therapies and has now advanced towards more advanced strategies. These have included the study of the functional assessment of brain activity to appreciate regions of the brain related to specific clinical problems and how these might be ameliorated. Related to this have been the developments of various approaches towards altering neurophysiology directly through non-invasive and only partially invasive strategies. These have included what is now referred to neurofeedback and several other neuromodulation strategies including slow cortical potentials, transcranial magnetic stimulation, transcranial direct current simulation, and even deep brain stimulation. Many of these have been reviewed in our recent text (see Coben, R., & Evans, J. R. (2011). Neurofeedback and neuromodulation techniques and applications. Amsterdam: Elsevier/Academic Press.). As such, there is increasing empirical support that these techniques can have significant therapeutic impact for various neuropsychiatric disorders including ADHD, Autism, Depression, Anxiety and many others. The greatest empirical support exists for the treatment of seizure and related disorders, either with or without the aide of medication. There is also new data to suggest that seizures and subclinical seizures may the results of faulty networks in the brain that are poorly regulated and that can be taught to be better regulated with such approaches. This Research topic of the Frontiers in Human Neuroscience will address these applications of Applied Neuroimaging, Neuromodulation and Neurfeedback applications for Seizure Disorders.

Specifically, we wish to includes articles related to:

• Uses of functional neuroimaging techniques (i.e., fMRI, SPECT, QEEG, ERP, sLoreta) in the assessment and understanding of seizures.
• Empirical research demonstrating efficacy of neurofeedback as an intervention for seizure disorders.

• Novel and new approaches to neurofeedback are also sought including those related to loreta neurofeedback, neural connectivity models, slow cortical potentials and other advanced strategies.

• Uses and evidence for the application of rTMS in the treatment of similar disorders.

• Evidence-based research related to TDCS for seizures are also of interest.

• We seek papers that may be specific for pediatrics and adults as well.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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