Research Topic

Low-dimensional Nanostructures for Point of Care Devices

About this Research Topic

Early and accurate diagnosis of diseases represented one of the biggest challenges during the past decades. In this context, and particularly in developing countries with poor infrastructure, these novel and effective analytical tools are crucial for early disease detection. Point-of-care (PoC) sensor devices, such as chip-based devices, membrane-based test strips, and smartphone‑based microfluidics are capable to monitor patients' health in a straightforward and cost-effective manner.

Low-dimensional nanostructures (LDNs), characterized by a high surface-to-volume ratio, represent extremely versatile platforms for the fabrication of (bio)chemical sensors featuring sensitivity, selectivity, fast response time, reusability, and stability beyond the state-of-the-art. Moreover, the adoption of sustainable materials such as paper-based substrates or the incorporation of 3D printing technologies is leading to new developments in this field. Hence, the synergistic combination of material science, sustainability, and microfabrication is of paramount importance for developing novel healthcare solutions for society.

Despite the tremendous technological advances in several research fields from materials science to molecular biology or supramolecular science, most of the efforts have been devoted to improving the performance of LDNs-based chemical (bio)sensors. Nowadays the attention is shifting toward the fabrication of new chemical (bio)sensors that present not only highly reproducibility, sensitivity, and specificity but also that fulfill economic and environmentally friendly requirements. Among the PoC technologies, the adoption of LDNs is currently highlighted as a marvelous sensing material for realizing innovative (bio)sensing paradigms, such as miniaturized fluidics-based platforms, chip-based devices, paper-based strips, and smartphone‑based colorimetric architectures. These emerging detection technologies are potentially applicable to different healthcare issues since they result in disposable, inexpensive, portable, easy to use, and sustainable devices.

The aim of this Research Topic is to cover promising, recent, and novel research trends in the use of Low-dimensional nanostructures for point of care device development. Areas to be covered in this Research Topic may include, but are not limited to:

• Point-of-care (bio)sensor devices
• Colorimetric (bio)sensors
• Paper-based (bio)sensor devices
• 3D printed (bio) sensors
• Lateral flow immunoassays
• Lab-on-a-chip (bio)sensors
• Smartphone‑based sensors


Keywords: biosensors, point of care, nanomaterials, nanostructures


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Early and accurate diagnosis of diseases represented one of the biggest challenges during the past decades. In this context, and particularly in developing countries with poor infrastructure, these novel and effective analytical tools are crucial for early disease detection. Point-of-care (PoC) sensor devices, such as chip-based devices, membrane-based test strips, and smartphone‑based microfluidics are capable to monitor patients' health in a straightforward and cost-effective manner.

Low-dimensional nanostructures (LDNs), characterized by a high surface-to-volume ratio, represent extremely versatile platforms for the fabrication of (bio)chemical sensors featuring sensitivity, selectivity, fast response time, reusability, and stability beyond the state-of-the-art. Moreover, the adoption of sustainable materials such as paper-based substrates or the incorporation of 3D printing technologies is leading to new developments in this field. Hence, the synergistic combination of material science, sustainability, and microfabrication is of paramount importance for developing novel healthcare solutions for society.

Despite the tremendous technological advances in several research fields from materials science to molecular biology or supramolecular science, most of the efforts have been devoted to improving the performance of LDNs-based chemical (bio)sensors. Nowadays the attention is shifting toward the fabrication of new chemical (bio)sensors that present not only highly reproducibility, sensitivity, and specificity but also that fulfill economic and environmentally friendly requirements. Among the PoC technologies, the adoption of LDNs is currently highlighted as a marvelous sensing material for realizing innovative (bio)sensing paradigms, such as miniaturized fluidics-based platforms, chip-based devices, paper-based strips, and smartphone‑based colorimetric architectures. These emerging detection technologies are potentially applicable to different healthcare issues since they result in disposable, inexpensive, portable, easy to use, and sustainable devices.

The aim of this Research Topic is to cover promising, recent, and novel research trends in the use of Low-dimensional nanostructures for point of care device development. Areas to be covered in this Research Topic may include, but are not limited to:

• Point-of-care (bio)sensor devices
• Colorimetric (bio)sensors
• Paper-based (bio)sensor devices
• 3D printed (bio) sensors
• Lateral flow immunoassays
• Lab-on-a-chip (bio)sensors
• Smartphone‑based sensors


Keywords: biosensors, point of care, nanomaterials, nanostructures


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

08 August 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

08 August 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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