Research Topic

Polyphenols and Cancer: Prevention and Survival

About this Research Topic

Current epidemiological evidence supports that a diet rich in fruits and vegetables could lower the risk of certain cancers, specially smoking-related cancers. This potential anti-carcinogenic effects have been attributed, in part, to natural polyphenols in these foods.

Natural polyphenols are plant secondary metabolites widely consumed by humans. They form a large and heterogeneous family of molecules and are divided into 4 main classes: flavonoids, phenolic acids, lignans, and stilbenes. Over the last three decades, a large body of in-vitro and animal studies has accumulated evidence on the potential specific and nonspecific anticarcinogenic properties. Epidemiological evidence in humans exploring the associations between polyphenol exposure and cancer risk and cancer prognosis is limited and in some cases inconsistent. Therefore, further well-designed studies are needed to provide more insights into the potential anti-cancer effects of polyphenols in order to recommend them for cancer prevention and survival, and during cancer treatment.

Thus, it is of paramount importance to provide evidence on the chemoprevention properties of polyphenols to fight cancer. Polyphenols of plants could be used to enhance cancer prevention and even to support conventional cancer treatments, if we refine the present knowledge of their role in cancer. To this end it is necessary to conduct rigorous studies of all kinds to evaluate the association between these compounds and cancer development, and to elucidate mechanisms underlying these anti-cancer effects. Also, it is essential to know how further cancer survival improvements could be achieved with these compounds.

This Research Topic will focus on the association between polyphenols and cancer risk, as well as cancer survival. Also, molecular nutrition studies exploring mechanisms of actions of polyphenols to prevent cancer and cancer-related outcomes will be taken into consideration. The Guest Editors will also consider articles focused on the connection between polyphenols and factors that can cause cancer or worsen its prognosis, such as obesity.

More precisely, we welcome articles in the form of Original Research, Short Communications, and Reviews addressing, but not limited to, the following sub-topics:

• Effects of polyphenol exposure (using dietary questionnaires and/or blood/urine biomarkers) on cancer risk and cancer survival;
• Molecular nutrition studies that may help elucidate mechanisms connecting polyphenols and cancer development or its outcomes;
• Association studies on polyphenols and potential mediators of the association between polyphenols and cancer, such as obesity;
• Intervention studies on polyphenol and polyphenol-rich foods to improve cancer prognosis;
• Systematic reviews and meta-analyses of the above described sub-topics.

Besides, dietary polyphenols such as flavonoids, stilbenes (resveratrol), lignans, curcuminoids, or more novel polyphenols having anti-cancer properties will be relevant to this Research Topic.


Keywords: Polyphenols, Cancer, Chemoprevention, Cancer Survival, Diet, Epidemiology, Molecular Mechanisms


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Current epidemiological evidence supports that a diet rich in fruits and vegetables could lower the risk of certain cancers, specially smoking-related cancers. This potential anti-carcinogenic effects have been attributed, in part, to natural polyphenols in these foods.

Natural polyphenols are plant secondary metabolites widely consumed by humans. They form a large and heterogeneous family of molecules and are divided into 4 main classes: flavonoids, phenolic acids, lignans, and stilbenes. Over the last three decades, a large body of in-vitro and animal studies has accumulated evidence on the potential specific and nonspecific anticarcinogenic properties. Epidemiological evidence in humans exploring the associations between polyphenol exposure and cancer risk and cancer prognosis is limited and in some cases inconsistent. Therefore, further well-designed studies are needed to provide more insights into the potential anti-cancer effects of polyphenols in order to recommend them for cancer prevention and survival, and during cancer treatment.

Thus, it is of paramount importance to provide evidence on the chemoprevention properties of polyphenols to fight cancer. Polyphenols of plants could be used to enhance cancer prevention and even to support conventional cancer treatments, if we refine the present knowledge of their role in cancer. To this end it is necessary to conduct rigorous studies of all kinds to evaluate the association between these compounds and cancer development, and to elucidate mechanisms underlying these anti-cancer effects. Also, it is essential to know how further cancer survival improvements could be achieved with these compounds.

This Research Topic will focus on the association between polyphenols and cancer risk, as well as cancer survival. Also, molecular nutrition studies exploring mechanisms of actions of polyphenols to prevent cancer and cancer-related outcomes will be taken into consideration. The Guest Editors will also consider articles focused on the connection between polyphenols and factors that can cause cancer or worsen its prognosis, such as obesity.

More precisely, we welcome articles in the form of Original Research, Short Communications, and Reviews addressing, but not limited to, the following sub-topics:

• Effects of polyphenol exposure (using dietary questionnaires and/or blood/urine biomarkers) on cancer risk and cancer survival;
• Molecular nutrition studies that may help elucidate mechanisms connecting polyphenols and cancer development or its outcomes;
• Association studies on polyphenols and potential mediators of the association between polyphenols and cancer, such as obesity;
• Intervention studies on polyphenol and polyphenol-rich foods to improve cancer prognosis;
• Systematic reviews and meta-analyses of the above described sub-topics.

Besides, dietary polyphenols such as flavonoids, stilbenes (resveratrol), lignans, curcuminoids, or more novel polyphenols having anti-cancer properties will be relevant to this Research Topic.


Keywords: Polyphenols, Cancer, Chemoprevention, Cancer Survival, Diet, Epidemiology, Molecular Mechanisms


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

17 May 2021 Abstract
16 December 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

17 May 2021 Abstract
16 December 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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