Research Topic

Managing Native AM Fungi Microbiome through Crop and Soil Management Practices in Agroecosystems

About this Research Topic

To meet the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), we must explore new ways to create sustainable food and agricultural systems for the ever-burgeoning world population. Intensive agricultural practices including the use of genetically modified crops and the external use of fertilizers and pesticides – although currently essential – are being overlooked in belowground microbial communities. The beneficial effects of the rhizosphere, the narrow region of soil where the myriad of microbial activities with plant roots is taking place, are adversely affected by soil microorganisms involved in nutrient cycling and maintaining plant health. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), the most common symbiotic association colonizing more than 80% of plants, are known to improve plant nutrition, growth, and health, and involves various ecological functions. Despite this, AMF communities are often adversely affected by non-favorable crop sequences, tillage practices, and the application of chemical pesticides and fertilizers.

Through an understanding of crop and soil management practices, it may be possible to identify practices that promote or inhibit microbial communities, such as AM fungi, thus affecting the ecological balance and functioning of resident AM fungi microbiomes in agroecosystems. Externally applied microbial bio-inoculants are often of poor quality and lower compatibility, rendering them sub-optimal or ineffective. New technological adaptations such as tillage, crop sequences, cover crops, genetically modified crops, organic-inorganic fertilization integrated practices, etc., are key factors for the successful implementation of resident soil-plant rhizosphere AMF microbiome in addressing the issues related to crop productivity, soil carbon sequestration, and soil and plant health. Hence, the management of native AMF microbiome or community through crop and soil management practices establishes a long-term solution for sustaining crop and soil productivity.

The goal of this Research Topic is to publish articles that present new insights or perspectives in the use of crop and soil management practices to regulate the native pool of rhizosphere AMF microbiome involved in nutrient cycling and the protection of environment, plant and soil health for sustaining productivity in agroecosystems. Reviews, Original Research, Methods, Perspectives, and Opinion Articles are all welcome for submission.

Specific topics may include but are not limited to:
• Management of native resident AM fungi through crop and soil management practices
• AM fungi adaptation and responses under stressed ecosystems, including salinity and heavy metal stresses
• AMF-mediated crop and soil management practices in soil carbon sequestration
• AM fungal community and diversity under different crop and soil management practices, including genetically modified plants
• Comparative efficacy of adapted AMF strains produced through substrate-based pot cultures and invitro produced strains.
• Managing native and resident AM fungi (natural management/local strains vs inoculation with exotic/commercial inocula) under different agroecosystems
• Strategies for production, tracking, and management of indigenous AM fungi (on-farm production, substrate-based pot cultures)


Keywords: AM fungi, crop and soil management practices, soil carbon sequestration, organic agriculture, AM fungal composition


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

To meet the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), we must explore new ways to create sustainable food and agricultural systems for the ever-burgeoning world population. Intensive agricultural practices including the use of genetically modified crops and the external use of fertilizers and pesticides – although currently essential – are being overlooked in belowground microbial communities. The beneficial effects of the rhizosphere, the narrow region of soil where the myriad of microbial activities with plant roots is taking place, are adversely affected by soil microorganisms involved in nutrient cycling and maintaining plant health. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), the most common symbiotic association colonizing more than 80% of plants, are known to improve plant nutrition, growth, and health, and involves various ecological functions. Despite this, AMF communities are often adversely affected by non-favorable crop sequences, tillage practices, and the application of chemical pesticides and fertilizers.

Through an understanding of crop and soil management practices, it may be possible to identify practices that promote or inhibit microbial communities, such as AM fungi, thus affecting the ecological balance and functioning of resident AM fungi microbiomes in agroecosystems. Externally applied microbial bio-inoculants are often of poor quality and lower compatibility, rendering them sub-optimal or ineffective. New technological adaptations such as tillage, crop sequences, cover crops, genetically modified crops, organic-inorganic fertilization integrated practices, etc., are key factors for the successful implementation of resident soil-plant rhizosphere AMF microbiome in addressing the issues related to crop productivity, soil carbon sequestration, and soil and plant health. Hence, the management of native AMF microbiome or community through crop and soil management practices establishes a long-term solution for sustaining crop and soil productivity.

The goal of this Research Topic is to publish articles that present new insights or perspectives in the use of crop and soil management practices to regulate the native pool of rhizosphere AMF microbiome involved in nutrient cycling and the protection of environment, plant and soil health for sustaining productivity in agroecosystems. Reviews, Original Research, Methods, Perspectives, and Opinion Articles are all welcome for submission.

Specific topics may include but are not limited to:
• Management of native resident AM fungi through crop and soil management practices
• AM fungi adaptation and responses under stressed ecosystems, including salinity and heavy metal stresses
• AMF-mediated crop and soil management practices in soil carbon sequestration
• AM fungal community and diversity under different crop and soil management practices, including genetically modified plants
• Comparative efficacy of adapted AMF strains produced through substrate-based pot cultures and invitro produced strains.
• Managing native and resident AM fungi (natural management/local strains vs inoculation with exotic/commercial inocula) under different agroecosystems
• Strategies for production, tracking, and management of indigenous AM fungi (on-farm production, substrate-based pot cultures)


Keywords: AM fungi, crop and soil management practices, soil carbon sequestration, organic agriculture, AM fungal composition


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

30 June 2021 Abstract
30 October 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

30 June 2021 Abstract
30 October 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..