Research Topic

Functional and Advanced Materials for Water Treatment and Desalination

About this Research Topic

Due to current consumption trends, existing accessible fresh water resources fail to provide enough water for everyone’s use. This has called for immediate focus on using alternative methods to provide fresh water, such as utilizing desalted seawater or recycling wastewater. Wastewater treatment and desalination have become crucial to meet fresh water demands in several water stressed regions around the globe. Apart from fresh water production for drinking purposes, the growing output of wastewater discharge from both municipal and industrial sources has led to strict governmental discharge regulations. Thus, this situation necessitates the use of advanced, optimized, and effective membranes for membrane separation technology.

Various types of functional materials have been developed over the years in meeting several specific requirements including disinfection, flux enhancement, fouling prevention, and enhanced selectivity. Coupling material properties to meet the end membrane requirements can be an effective approach for tacking the current challenges.

In order to advance in this field, novel membranes are required which can tackle both harsh contaminants and highly saline waters. Apart from contaminant rejection, membrane fouling is another critical problem which needs to be addressed. Hydrophilic membrane surfaces are one solution which can be achieved by focusing research on materials with intrinsic properties that are desirable for target water treatment applications. Innovation in advanced materials can be the key for effective fresh water production.

To this end, we welcome manuscripts that focus on novel chemical synthesis, membrane fabrication, separation design and/or characterization, and removal of both contaminants and salts by conventional or membrane processes. The manuscripts should have clear relevance to separation technologies targeting wastewater treatment and/or desalination. The focus of the manuscripts can be either membrane-specific or may use process/module design and optimization. Research works from non-commercialized separation technologies, which are in their early research stages are also welcome for submission.


Keywords: wastewater treatment, membranes, analytical chemistry, desalination, nanomaterials


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Due to current consumption trends, existing accessible fresh water resources fail to provide enough water for everyone’s use. This has called for immediate focus on using alternative methods to provide fresh water, such as utilizing desalted seawater or recycling wastewater. Wastewater treatment and desalination have become crucial to meet fresh water demands in several water stressed regions around the globe. Apart from fresh water production for drinking purposes, the growing output of wastewater discharge from both municipal and industrial sources has led to strict governmental discharge regulations. Thus, this situation necessitates the use of advanced, optimized, and effective membranes for membrane separation technology.

Various types of functional materials have been developed over the years in meeting several specific requirements including disinfection, flux enhancement, fouling prevention, and enhanced selectivity. Coupling material properties to meet the end membrane requirements can be an effective approach for tacking the current challenges.

In order to advance in this field, novel membranes are required which can tackle both harsh contaminants and highly saline waters. Apart from contaminant rejection, membrane fouling is another critical problem which needs to be addressed. Hydrophilic membrane surfaces are one solution which can be achieved by focusing research on materials with intrinsic properties that are desirable for target water treatment applications. Innovation in advanced materials can be the key for effective fresh water production.

To this end, we welcome manuscripts that focus on novel chemical synthesis, membrane fabrication, separation design and/or characterization, and removal of both contaminants and salts by conventional or membrane processes. The manuscripts should have clear relevance to separation technologies targeting wastewater treatment and/or desalination. The focus of the manuscripts can be either membrane-specific or may use process/module design and optimization. Research works from non-commercialized separation technologies, which are in their early research stages are also welcome for submission.


Keywords: wastewater treatment, membranes, analytical chemistry, desalination, nanomaterials


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

21 May 2021 Abstract
01 September 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

21 May 2021 Abstract
01 September 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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