Research Topic

Design of Drug Carriers by Controlled Molecular Assembly of Functional Excipients for Better Drug Delivery

About this Research Topic

The use of suitable excipients for a given drug formulation method can result in improved pharmacological treatment, as optimal formulation allows for lower doses to be administered, achieving higher bioavailability, which can, in turn, have significant implications in pharmacological interventions. Precise molecular assembly of drug carriers is the core technology of targeted drug delivery systems (tDDS), which is used for the construction, control, and delivery of drugs to the biological target site as needed to safely achieve the desired therapeutic effect.


Among numerous drug carrier systems, excipient-based nano/micro-particle systems as drug carriers have shown great potential in recent years. It has been shown that encapsulating drugs in particles, including micelles, liposomes, dendrimers, nano-capsules, and nanospheres, can improve the therapeutic index and reduce side effects.


The goal of this project is to shed light upon insightful recent research trends and outlooks on emerging strategies to develop new chemical tools/protocols to improve existing drug properties using functional excipients, as well as discovering new drug formulations. Manuscripts expected should be primarily related to the molecular assembly science of excipient drug carriers, using macromolecular polymers, biopolymers, vesicles, emulsion, composites, complexes, self-assemblies, etc.


The scope of this Research Topic covers state-of-the-art synthesis and functions of tDDS and drug enforcement/repositioning, focusing on the chemical design of drug carrier materials in a biocompatible fashion. Original Research, Reviews, and Mini-Reviews are welcome. Subthemes of special interest are as below:

• Exploring novel drug carriers/encapsulants and/or how to formulate novel nanoparticles.

• Exploring how to trigger the nanoparticles to release specific medications under particular conditions, i.e., stimuli-responsive drug release, smart excipients, and bio-inspired drug formulation

• Exploring how to develop translatable DDS formulation beyond micelles, liposomes, etc.

 

Dr. Jeong-Hwan Kim receives funding from FugenBio Inc. Dr. Andrea Kim and Dr. Keun-Woo Lee receive funding from Hankookliposome Co. Ltd. All other Topic Editors declare no competing interests.



Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The use of suitable excipients for a given drug formulation method can result in improved pharmacological treatment, as optimal formulation allows for lower doses to be administered, achieving higher bioavailability, which can, in turn, have significant implications in pharmacological interventions. Precise molecular assembly of drug carriers is the core technology of targeted drug delivery systems (tDDS), which is used for the construction, control, and delivery of drugs to the biological target site as needed to safely achieve the desired therapeutic effect.


Among numerous drug carrier systems, excipient-based nano/micro-particle systems as drug carriers have shown great potential in recent years. It has been shown that encapsulating drugs in particles, including micelles, liposomes, dendrimers, nano-capsules, and nanospheres, can improve the therapeutic index and reduce side effects.


The goal of this project is to shed light upon insightful recent research trends and outlooks on emerging strategies to develop new chemical tools/protocols to improve existing drug properties using functional excipients, as well as discovering new drug formulations. Manuscripts expected should be primarily related to the molecular assembly science of excipient drug carriers, using macromolecular polymers, biopolymers, vesicles, emulsion, composites, complexes, self-assemblies, etc.


The scope of this Research Topic covers state-of-the-art synthesis and functions of tDDS and drug enforcement/repositioning, focusing on the chemical design of drug carrier materials in a biocompatible fashion. Original Research, Reviews, and Mini-Reviews are welcome. Subthemes of special interest are as below:

• Exploring novel drug carriers/encapsulants and/or how to formulate novel nanoparticles.

• Exploring how to trigger the nanoparticles to release specific medications under particular conditions, i.e., stimuli-responsive drug release, smart excipients, and bio-inspired drug formulation

• Exploring how to develop translatable DDS formulation beyond micelles, liposomes, etc.

 

Dr. Jeong-Hwan Kim receives funding from FugenBio Inc. Dr. Andrea Kim and Dr. Keun-Woo Lee receive funding from Hankookliposome Co. Ltd. All other Topic Editors declare no competing interests.



Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

25 August 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

25 August 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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