Research Topic

Antimicrobial Resistance in Pregnant Women, Neonates and Infants: Implications for the Sustainable Development

About this Research Topic

In 2015, the United Nations developed the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), as a universal call to end poverty, hunger, ensure global health and security and transform the world by 2030. But, the antimicrobial resistance (AMR) pandemic which is a global health crisis with extensive health, economic and societal repercussions, appears as a serious threat for the achievement of SDGs. The ongoing global problem of maternal, neonatal and child mortality has highlighted the importance of curbing AMR, in order to preserve antimicrobial effectiveness for future generations and thereby contributing to the achievement of sustainable development. In sharp contrast to the situation in developed countries, infectious diseases are still the leading cause of maternal, fetal, and newborn morbidity and mortality in low-and middle-income countries (LMICs). Despite recognized global progress, an increasing proportion of child deaths occur still in Sub-Saharan Africa and Southern Asia.

Although being most hit by AMR and in contrast with developed countries, in developing countries, screening of dangerous bacteria especially group B streptococcus during the later stages of pregnancy is not always implemented. This precludes the early detection and treatment of infections, and consequently increases mother to child transmission of resistant bacteria. Moreover, other important bacteria such as Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Clostridium perfringens, Streptococcus pneumoniae, etc. ,may be involved in serious life-threatening infections among pregnant women, neonates and infants, increasing thereby both maternal and child morbidity and mortality. This topic will be thus a timely and valuable opportunity to fill out this abyssal gap and contribute to improvement of knowledge on AMR and maternal, neonatal and infant morbidity and mortality, essential to reach sustainability by 2030.

Areas of research may include but are not limited to: - The burden and contribution of the asymptomatic carriage of resistant bacteria in the microbiome of parturients as source of infections in neonates and infants - Manuscripts reporting transmission of resistant bacteria from mother-newborn dyads using state-of-the-art technology and especially in LMICs are most welcome - We encourage research submissions that document innovative tools for early detection of infections and rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing in maternal and neonatal health. - Research that expands the knowledge of maternal and neonatal health through the analysis of resistant foodborne or waterborne pathogens and their transmission to pregnant women, and/or neonates, and/or infants are encouraged. - Particular attention will be given to research articles that investigate disease prevention strategies or measures that are cost-effectives.


Keywords: Antimicrobial resistance, maternal and neonatal health, sustainable development, state-of-the-art technology, infectious diseases, developing countries


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

In 2015, the United Nations developed the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), as a universal call to end poverty, hunger, ensure global health and security and transform the world by 2030. But, the antimicrobial resistance (AMR) pandemic which is a global health crisis with extensive health, economic and societal repercussions, appears as a serious threat for the achievement of SDGs. The ongoing global problem of maternal, neonatal and child mortality has highlighted the importance of curbing AMR, in order to preserve antimicrobial effectiveness for future generations and thereby contributing to the achievement of sustainable development. In sharp contrast to the situation in developed countries, infectious diseases are still the leading cause of maternal, fetal, and newborn morbidity and mortality in low-and middle-income countries (LMICs). Despite recognized global progress, an increasing proportion of child deaths occur still in Sub-Saharan Africa and Southern Asia.

Although being most hit by AMR and in contrast with developed countries, in developing countries, screening of dangerous bacteria especially group B streptococcus during the later stages of pregnancy is not always implemented. This precludes the early detection and treatment of infections, and consequently increases mother to child transmission of resistant bacteria. Moreover, other important bacteria such as Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Clostridium perfringens, Streptococcus pneumoniae, etc. ,may be involved in serious life-threatening infections among pregnant women, neonates and infants, increasing thereby both maternal and child morbidity and mortality. This topic will be thus a timely and valuable opportunity to fill out this abyssal gap and contribute to improvement of knowledge on AMR and maternal, neonatal and infant morbidity and mortality, essential to reach sustainability by 2030.

Areas of research may include but are not limited to: - The burden and contribution of the asymptomatic carriage of resistant bacteria in the microbiome of parturients as source of infections in neonates and infants - Manuscripts reporting transmission of resistant bacteria from mother-newborn dyads using state-of-the-art technology and especially in LMICs are most welcome - We encourage research submissions that document innovative tools for early detection of infections and rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing in maternal and neonatal health. - Research that expands the knowledge of maternal and neonatal health through the analysis of resistant foodborne or waterborne pathogens and their transmission to pregnant women, and/or neonates, and/or infants are encouraged. - Particular attention will be given to research articles that investigate disease prevention strategies or measures that are cost-effectives.


Keywords: Antimicrobial resistance, maternal and neonatal health, sustainable development, state-of-the-art technology, infectious diseases, developing countries


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

04 July 2021 Abstract
31 December 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

04 July 2021 Abstract
31 December 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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