Research Topic

Flowering Mechanisms in Fruit Trees as mediated by Light and Nitrogen

About this Research Topic

Light plays a key role in the regulation of many physiological processes required for plant development and modulates many metabolic networks and reactions by its intensity and spectral composition, including flowering mechanisms. Flowering time regulation could be additionally influenced by nitrogen availability, which plays a crucial role in the plant transition from the vegetative to the reproductive stage to fruitfulness and maximizing crop yield and sustainability [1].

Natural variation in photoperiodic flowering responses and compounds signals are decisive for floral induction and timing of flowering [2]. Photoperiod and flower induction are reported to be controlled by interacting inputs such as circadian clock and light receptors. These can extensively regulate transcription of the chloroplast genome, while the addition of blue to red light and continuous light (LL) was reported to increase biomass and yield and to accelerate the reproductive cycle in plants. Thus, their manipulation may help increase growth and production in high-value crops [3]. Recently, nitrogen (N) has been considered a key element in plant flowering [4]. The interactions among N mineral plant nutrition, N effect on plant flowering, the improvement of NUE, and maximizing crop yield have been intensively studied in recent decades, though the key genes which are related to the light perception and photoperiodic flowering modulation in response to nitrate uptake are still unknown.

Taking these interactions into account, this Research Topic aims to collect studies that better elucidate the molecular, physiological, and biochemical factors and networks that lead to N control of flowering under different quality and length of light. The resulted knowledge will provide information to researchers, breeders, and farmers to grow low-input crops improving sustainable productions.

We welcome submissions relating, in particular, to the following themes:
• Physiology, molecular, genetic, and epigenetic mechanisms underlying the control of bud dormancy cycle and plant flowering mediated by light and N
• Modeling bud break and flowering.
• Artificial manipulation of flowering and dormancy in fruit trees.
• Flowering behavior of fruit trees under global climate change.

Please note:
- Studies defining gene families or descriptive collection of transcripts, proteins, or metabolites, will not be considered for review unless they are expanded and provide mechanistic and/or physiological insights into the biological system or process being studied.
- Descriptive studies that report responses to a given treatment will not be considered if they do not progress physiological understanding of these responses.


[1] Olas et al 2019. New Phytol. 223:814; Lin & Tsay 2017. J. Exp. Bot. 68:2603; Guo & Yang 1998 Science 279:1360
[2] Bao et al 2019. Dev Cell 50:90.
[3] Kaiser et al 2019 Front. Plant Sci. 9:2002; Facella et al 2017 FEBS Open Bio. 7:456; Sysoeva et al 2010 Plant Stress 4:1
[4] Lin & Tsay 2017 J. Exp. Bot. 68:2603; Yuan et al 2016 Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 113:7661



Keywords: Light Perception, Flowering, Alternate Bearing, Juvenility, Fruit Crops, NUE


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Light plays a key role in the regulation of many physiological processes required for plant development and modulates many metabolic networks and reactions by its intensity and spectral composition, including flowering mechanisms. Flowering time regulation could be additionally influenced by nitrogen availability, which plays a crucial role in the plant transition from the vegetative to the reproductive stage to fruitfulness and maximizing crop yield and sustainability [1].

Natural variation in photoperiodic flowering responses and compounds signals are decisive for floral induction and timing of flowering [2]. Photoperiod and flower induction are reported to be controlled by interacting inputs such as circadian clock and light receptors. These can extensively regulate transcription of the chloroplast genome, while the addition of blue to red light and continuous light (LL) was reported to increase biomass and yield and to accelerate the reproductive cycle in plants. Thus, their manipulation may help increase growth and production in high-value crops [3]. Recently, nitrogen (N) has been considered a key element in plant flowering [4]. The interactions among N mineral plant nutrition, N effect on plant flowering, the improvement of NUE, and maximizing crop yield have been intensively studied in recent decades, though the key genes which are related to the light perception and photoperiodic flowering modulation in response to nitrate uptake are still unknown.

Taking these interactions into account, this Research Topic aims to collect studies that better elucidate the molecular, physiological, and biochemical factors and networks that lead to N control of flowering under different quality and length of light. The resulted knowledge will provide information to researchers, breeders, and farmers to grow low-input crops improving sustainable productions.

We welcome submissions relating, in particular, to the following themes:
• Physiology, molecular, genetic, and epigenetic mechanisms underlying the control of bud dormancy cycle and plant flowering mediated by light and N
• Modeling bud break and flowering.
• Artificial manipulation of flowering and dormancy in fruit trees.
• Flowering behavior of fruit trees under global climate change.

Please note:
- Studies defining gene families or descriptive collection of transcripts, proteins, or metabolites, will not be considered for review unless they are expanded and provide mechanistic and/or physiological insights into the biological system or process being studied.
- Descriptive studies that report responses to a given treatment will not be considered if they do not progress physiological understanding of these responses.


[1] Olas et al 2019. New Phytol. 223:814; Lin & Tsay 2017. J. Exp. Bot. 68:2603; Guo & Yang 1998 Science 279:1360
[2] Bao et al 2019. Dev Cell 50:90.
[3] Kaiser et al 2019 Front. Plant Sci. 9:2002; Facella et al 2017 FEBS Open Bio. 7:456; Sysoeva et al 2010 Plant Stress 4:1
[4] Lin & Tsay 2017 J. Exp. Bot. 68:2603; Yuan et al 2016 Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 113:7661



Keywords: Light Perception, Flowering, Alternate Bearing, Juvenility, Fruit Crops, NUE


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

02 July 2021 Abstract
26 November 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

02 July 2021 Abstract
26 November 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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