Research Topic

Advances in Modern Mental Chronometry

About this Research Topic

Mental chronometry can be defined as the measurement of response time and has been a fundamental tool in the non-invasive study of sensory perception and cognition and in human task performance over more than a century. Mental chronometry has evolved from different methodologies and mathematical models into a ...

Mental chronometry can be defined as the measurement of response time and has been a fundamental tool in the non-invasive study of sensory perception and cognition and in human task performance over more than a century. Mental chronometry has evolved from different methodologies and mathematical models into a standard paradigm to study unsolved problems in human neuroscience and psychophysics. Typical examples are the extensive research on simple and choice reaction times in perceptual-motor tasks, response timing; estimation of temporal intervals, temporal-order detection, etc. In addition, the combination of brain imaging and neurophysiological techniques with mental chronometry has opened new perspectives and has provided new insights into temporal coding, organization and efficiency of internal processing stages and neural activity in multiple tasks. Examples are the analysis of reaction times together with event-related potentials, transcranial magnetic stimulation, functional magnetic resonant imaging, etc.
This Research Topic will focus on recent advances of mental chronometry at all levels of analysis. Thus we welcome hypothesis & theory, methods, opinion, reviews, mini reviews, perspective, clinical case study and original research papers on the fundamentals on mental chronometry; papers at the interface between mental chronometry and other non-invasive techniques and papers on mental chronometry with applications in areas such as computational neuroscience, neural networks, brain diseases, animal models, artificial intelligence, robotics, etc. Topics on response times include, but are not limited to:

• Human visual system, other sensory systems, intersensory integration, neural basis.
• Brain functions in health, diseases and disorders (schizophrenia, attention-deficit disorders, autism, etc.)
• Treatment and assessment of intrinsic stochastic variability (e.g. 1/f noise, etc.).
• Methods, theories and models (diffusion models, self-organized criticality, fractals, chaos, serial vs. parallel processing, models of information processing, etc.).
• Applications to air and land navigation (e.g., fatigue, hypoxia, driving safety, etc.).
• Brain imaging technologies.
• Sports medicine and physiology.
• Decision making (e.g., chess players, etc.).
• Redundant target effect.
• Human movement.
• Motor response.
• Attention.
• Aging.

The MR image at the top is an adaptation
from an animated GIF file that contains a sequence of saggital
transections through a human brain.

Author: Christian R. Linder.
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Brain_chrischan_300.gif

This file is under a Creative Commons License.


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