Research Topic

Immunological Challenges Around Pregnancy Complications Associated with Failures of Maternal Tolerance to the Fetus

About this Research Topic

Successful pregnancy provides an intriguing immunologic paradox. The fetus carries both paternal and maternal genes and therefore is for 50% foreign to the mother but is tolerated by the maternal immune system. Immune tolerance is thought to be driven by immune modulatory mechanisms that operate locally at the fetal-maternal interface. This Research Topic will focus on the potential immunological basis of pregnancy complications that arise from failures of maternal tolerance to the fetus, which may be encountered throughout gestation, at first term or later.

As the fetal cells are tolerated by the maternal immune system in healthy pregnancy, immunological mechanisms and disturbances therein may underlie recurrent pregnancy loss. Hereby, women have had two or more spontaneous miscarriages. It affects 3% of all fertile couples. In more than 50% of couples, the underlying cause is not clear, and it is thought that this is of an immunologic nature.

In pregnancy, chronic intervillositis of unknown etiology (CIUE) is a poorly understood histopathological lesion. CIUE is significantly associated with fetal growth restriction and intrauterine fetal death. In this disease, an intervillous infiltrate mostly of maternal origin is encountered in the placenta. The interplay between maternal immune cells and fetal trophoblasts in this disease might point toward a breach in immune tolerance and is a topic for ongoing research.
In pregnancy from a donated oocyte, the fetus carries genes of the oocyte donor and of the father. Thus, the antigens of the fetus are completely foreign compared to those of the mother. Consequently, oocyte donation pregnancies are associated with a higher risk of complications compared to natural-conceived pregnancies. Pregnancy conceived after oocyte donation reflects an interesting model to study immunological reactions.

Several complications of pregnancy are more frequent in women with autoimmune diseases such as antiphospholipid syndrome or systemic lupus erythematosus. These include spontaneous abortion, intrauterine fetal death, intrauterine fetal growth restriction, preterm birth and premature rupture of membranes, and preeclampsia. The immunological challenges faced by these mothers may change maternal peripheral tolerance complicating pregnancy and/or ameliorating their symptomatology. Understanding the unique immunological situation in pregnancy and autoimmune disease could contribute to predict and intervene the mother’s disease course and the development of her fetus.

For this Research Topic, authors are encouraged to submit contribution that concerns study of the immune system in complicated pregnancies, possibly in relation to healthy pregnancy. We particularly welcome Original Research, Reviews, Clinical Trials, Methods, and Perspective articles covering, but not limited to the following subtopics:
- immunological aspects of unexplained (recurrent) pregnancy loss
- chronic inflammation and intervillositis of unknown etiology (CIUE)
- immunology in oocyte donation pregnancies
- immunology in pregnancy complications
- autoimmune diseases and pregnancy


Keywords: Pregnancy; Complications; Tolerance; Fetus


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Successful pregnancy provides an intriguing immunologic paradox. The fetus carries both paternal and maternal genes and therefore is for 50% foreign to the mother but is tolerated by the maternal immune system. Immune tolerance is thought to be driven by immune modulatory mechanisms that operate locally at the fetal-maternal interface. This Research Topic will focus on the potential immunological basis of pregnancy complications that arise from failures of maternal tolerance to the fetus, which may be encountered throughout gestation, at first term or later.

As the fetal cells are tolerated by the maternal immune system in healthy pregnancy, immunological mechanisms and disturbances therein may underlie recurrent pregnancy loss. Hereby, women have had two or more spontaneous miscarriages. It affects 3% of all fertile couples. In more than 50% of couples, the underlying cause is not clear, and it is thought that this is of an immunologic nature.

In pregnancy, chronic intervillositis of unknown etiology (CIUE) is a poorly understood histopathological lesion. CIUE is significantly associated with fetal growth restriction and intrauterine fetal death. In this disease, an intervillous infiltrate mostly of maternal origin is encountered in the placenta. The interplay between maternal immune cells and fetal trophoblasts in this disease might point toward a breach in immune tolerance and is a topic for ongoing research.
In pregnancy from a donated oocyte, the fetus carries genes of the oocyte donor and of the father. Thus, the antigens of the fetus are completely foreign compared to those of the mother. Consequently, oocyte donation pregnancies are associated with a higher risk of complications compared to natural-conceived pregnancies. Pregnancy conceived after oocyte donation reflects an interesting model to study immunological reactions.

Several complications of pregnancy are more frequent in women with autoimmune diseases such as antiphospholipid syndrome or systemic lupus erythematosus. These include spontaneous abortion, intrauterine fetal death, intrauterine fetal growth restriction, preterm birth and premature rupture of membranes, and preeclampsia. The immunological challenges faced by these mothers may change maternal peripheral tolerance complicating pregnancy and/or ameliorating their symptomatology. Understanding the unique immunological situation in pregnancy and autoimmune disease could contribute to predict and intervene the mother’s disease course and the development of her fetus.

For this Research Topic, authors are encouraged to submit contribution that concerns study of the immune system in complicated pregnancies, possibly in relation to healthy pregnancy. We particularly welcome Original Research, Reviews, Clinical Trials, Methods, and Perspective articles covering, but not limited to the following subtopics:
- immunological aspects of unexplained (recurrent) pregnancy loss
- chronic inflammation and intervillositis of unknown etiology (CIUE)
- immunology in oocyte donation pregnancies
- immunology in pregnancy complications
- autoimmune diseases and pregnancy


Keywords: Pregnancy; Complications; Tolerance; Fetus


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

30 June 2021 Abstract
31 October 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

30 June 2021 Abstract
31 October 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..