Research Topic

Modelling of Network Physiology in Aging and Frailty: Approaches and Methods

About this Research Topic

The Networks in Aging and Frailty section of Frontiers in Network Physiology publishes high-quality biomedical, population health, clinical, applied, translational and technology-focused research across the field of human aging, with a focus on measuring, modelling, and understanding the complex dynamic interactions that occur between aging physiological systems. The journal aims to cover the wide spectrum of aging, ranging from healthy states characterized by physiological resilience, to diseased states of dysregulation in multiple physiological systems conferring vulnerability to stressors. The latter is defined as frailty. Modelling of Network Physiology in Aging and Frailty is a challenge because older people have been less included in human physiology research.

Datasets where the physiology of older people has been measured across body systems are emerging, and this focus issue welcomes their scientific outputs. Data from human epidemiological, laboratory-based and clinical studies are all welcome. Of particular interest to this focus issue is the study of network physiology in aging adults both at rest and in dynamic situations requiring some degree of effort. Research studies that attempt to understand or model the concept of physiological reserve in older adults will be particularly welcome. This focus issue also explores challenges and new methodologies in physiological signal collection and processing in aging adults. Indeed, physiological signals in aging states may be intrinsically different and more challenging to collect and process. In these scenarios, signals may be regarded as ‘noisier’ or more ‘artefactual’, but little is known about how different signal processing features relate to meaningful clinical outcomes in ageing adults. Submissions that attempt to refine our understanding of new features in physiological signals in aging adults will be welcome. This special issue will also welcome advanced visualizations of the physiological behaviour of single or multiple physiological systems in aging adults, both at rest and dynamically.

Specific themes that we welcome from contributors include (but are not limited to):
• Defining and modelling the concept of physiological reserve in older adults
• Network physiology approaches that explore the differences between robust and frail older adults
• Modelling physiological ‘stressors’ in older adults
• New methodologies in physiological signal collection and processing in aging adults
• Novel approaches to extraction of clinically relevant features in physiological signals in older adults
• Network physiology visualizations to illustrate frailty and/or resilience in older adults

Authors are encouraged to submit any article type to our Research Topic.


Keywords: aging, frailty, physiology, reserve, modelling


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The Networks in Aging and Frailty section of Frontiers in Network Physiology publishes high-quality biomedical, population health, clinical, applied, translational and technology-focused research across the field of human aging, with a focus on measuring, modelling, and understanding the complex dynamic interactions that occur between aging physiological systems. The journal aims to cover the wide spectrum of aging, ranging from healthy states characterized by physiological resilience, to diseased states of dysregulation in multiple physiological systems conferring vulnerability to stressors. The latter is defined as frailty. Modelling of Network Physiology in Aging and Frailty is a challenge because older people have been less included in human physiology research.

Datasets where the physiology of older people has been measured across body systems are emerging, and this focus issue welcomes their scientific outputs. Data from human epidemiological, laboratory-based and clinical studies are all welcome. Of particular interest to this focus issue is the study of network physiology in aging adults both at rest and in dynamic situations requiring some degree of effort. Research studies that attempt to understand or model the concept of physiological reserve in older adults will be particularly welcome. This focus issue also explores challenges and new methodologies in physiological signal collection and processing in aging adults. Indeed, physiological signals in aging states may be intrinsically different and more challenging to collect and process. In these scenarios, signals may be regarded as ‘noisier’ or more ‘artefactual’, but little is known about how different signal processing features relate to meaningful clinical outcomes in ageing adults. Submissions that attempt to refine our understanding of new features in physiological signals in aging adults will be welcome. This special issue will also welcome advanced visualizations of the physiological behaviour of single or multiple physiological systems in aging adults, both at rest and dynamically.

Specific themes that we welcome from contributors include (but are not limited to):
• Defining and modelling the concept of physiological reserve in older adults
• Network physiology approaches that explore the differences between robust and frail older adults
• Modelling physiological ‘stressors’ in older adults
• New methodologies in physiological signal collection and processing in aging adults
• Novel approaches to extraction of clinically relevant features in physiological signals in older adults
• Network physiology visualizations to illustrate frailty and/or resilience in older adults

Authors are encouraged to submit any article type to our Research Topic.


Keywords: aging, frailty, physiology, reserve, modelling


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

31 May 2021 Abstract
30 September 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

31 May 2021 Abstract
30 September 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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