Research Topic

The Impact of Microorganisms on Consumption of Atmospheric Trace Gases

About this Research Topic

Global climate change is driven by a changing atmospheric chemistry, which is tightly coupled to net exchange of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), NOx gases, and molecular hydrogen (H2) with the biosphere. Examples for such compounds are reduced mono carbon (C1) compounds (such as methane [CH4], methanol, ...

Global climate change is driven by a changing atmospheric chemistry, which is tightly coupled to net exchange of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), NOx gases, and molecular hydrogen (H2) with the biosphere. Examples for such compounds are reduced mono carbon (C1) compounds (such as methane [CH4], methanol, carbon monooxide, halogenated and sulfur-containing C1 compounds), terpenoids (such as monoterpenes), isoprene, nitrous oxide (N2O), and nitric oxide. Microorganisms have a pivotal role in regulating global budgets of atmospheric gases, and an understanding of the role of non-phototrophic microorganisms on global change is mandatory to predict global effects on atmospheric chemistry. Exemplarily, microbial methane production and consumption have been investigated in many studies over the past three decades, and revealed a rich diversity of methanotrophs and complex environmental controls of their activities. Recent discoveries suggest that not only aerated but as well waterlogged soils are involved in methane consumption mediated by nitrite-reducing methanotrophs. Atmospheric concentrations of less investigated VOCs and NOx gases, and H2 are as well impacted by activities of microbial communities in surface layer of oceans, and the surface soils and phyllosphere of terrestrial ecosystems.
The proposed Research Topic will deal with 'Microorganisms Impacts on Consumption of Atmospheric Trace Gases'. Our intention is to get a topical view on the impact of microorganisms on uptake of atmospheric trace gases in diverse ecosystems, based on examples that reflect the broad range of physiological groups that are involved. We welcome contributions from the field of environmental microbiology and related fields that address structural and ecophysiological aspects of microbial communities or provide insight into (eco)physiological model organisms of ecosystems consuming atmospheric trace gases. We aim at covering a broad range of methodological approaches and encourage contributions that employ proteomics and next generation sequencing technologies, culture-based physiological methods, stable isotope probing techniques, multivariate statistics, and cross disciplinary approaches. Original research articles, perspectives, and reviews are welcomed. Contributions that address little investigated atmospheric gases in regard to microbial consumption will be highly appreciated.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Recent Articles

Loading..

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

Submission closed.

Participating Journals

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

Submission closed.

Participating Journals

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..

Comments

Loading..

Add a comment

Add comment
Back to top