Research Topic

pH-Responsive Vesicular Nanocarriers in Cancer Therapy

About this Research Topic

The success of cancer chemotherapy depends on many factors, such as the active agent, dosage form, patient condition, and chemotherapy regimen. Improving the drug formulations is as important as the discovery of new anticancer drugs. The use of nanotechnology to develop better dosage forms in cancer treatment has brought new hopes for a cure. Direct administration of anticancer drugs is limited due to their low aqueous solubility and low bioavailability. There are several approaches to increase the bioavailability of anticancer drugs. One of these methods is the development of pH-responsive nanocarriers.

Drug carrier systems utilizing vesicles have been extensively studied to use them to enhance oral anticancer drug bioavailability and reduce side effects. Niosomes and liposomes are among the best vesicular nanocarriers in cancer therapy. A niosome is a non-ionic surfactant-based vesicle. Niosomes are formed mostly by non-ionic surfactant and cholesterol incorporation as an excipient. Also, a liposome is a spherical vesicle having at least one lipid bilayer and made up of phospholipids.

Vesicular drug delivery systems can overcome many obstacles of traditional chemotherapy. To solve these problems, different triggered release mechanisms have been designed for vesicles to promote drug concentrations in target tissues or cell compartments. Many pH-sensitive systems are based on pH-responsive peptides or proteins that can efficiently trigger membrane fusion/disruption at acidic pH levels. Recently, considerable efforts have been made to develop vesicles that are stable under normal physiological conditions but become destabilized and release their contents in the environment of tumor tissues, which are more acidic than healthy tissues.

The aim of this Research Topic is the development of smart nanocarriers that have a controlled and targeted release to cancer cells. These smart nanocarriers can be niosome, liposome, metal-organic framework, magnetic nanoparticles, microemulsions, etc. the developed systems can be used for bioavailability and solubility enhancement of anticancer drugs and active agents. Areas to be covered in this Research Topic may include, but are not limited to:

• Development of pH-responsive nanocarriers by different methods and different conditions (pH, temperature, concentration, etc.)
• Increase the bioavailability of anticancer drugs; Most anticancer drugs and antioxidant phytochemicals are lipophilic with low solubility
• Design of controlled release systems; the release of encapsulated active agent in a targeted, sustained, and controlled manner
• In vitro and in vivo studies. In vivo refers to when research or work is done with or within an entire, living organism. Examples can include studies in animal models or human clinical trials. In vitro is used to describe work that's performed outside of a living organism
• Characterization of nanocarriers with a different instruments such as Dynamic light scattering (DLS), scanning electron microscope (SEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), etc


Keywords: pH-responsive, vesicular system, anticancer drugs, liposome, noisome


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The success of cancer chemotherapy depends on many factors, such as the active agent, dosage form, patient condition, and chemotherapy regimen. Improving the drug formulations is as important as the discovery of new anticancer drugs. The use of nanotechnology to develop better dosage forms in cancer treatment has brought new hopes for a cure. Direct administration of anticancer drugs is limited due to their low aqueous solubility and low bioavailability. There are several approaches to increase the bioavailability of anticancer drugs. One of these methods is the development of pH-responsive nanocarriers.

Drug carrier systems utilizing vesicles have been extensively studied to use them to enhance oral anticancer drug bioavailability and reduce side effects. Niosomes and liposomes are among the best vesicular nanocarriers in cancer therapy. A niosome is a non-ionic surfactant-based vesicle. Niosomes are formed mostly by non-ionic surfactant and cholesterol incorporation as an excipient. Also, a liposome is a spherical vesicle having at least one lipid bilayer and made up of phospholipids.

Vesicular drug delivery systems can overcome many obstacles of traditional chemotherapy. To solve these problems, different triggered release mechanisms have been designed for vesicles to promote drug concentrations in target tissues or cell compartments. Many pH-sensitive systems are based on pH-responsive peptides or proteins that can efficiently trigger membrane fusion/disruption at acidic pH levels. Recently, considerable efforts have been made to develop vesicles that are stable under normal physiological conditions but become destabilized and release their contents in the environment of tumor tissues, which are more acidic than healthy tissues.

The aim of this Research Topic is the development of smart nanocarriers that have a controlled and targeted release to cancer cells. These smart nanocarriers can be niosome, liposome, metal-organic framework, magnetic nanoparticles, microemulsions, etc. the developed systems can be used for bioavailability and solubility enhancement of anticancer drugs and active agents. Areas to be covered in this Research Topic may include, but are not limited to:

• Development of pH-responsive nanocarriers by different methods and different conditions (pH, temperature, concentration, etc.)
• Increase the bioavailability of anticancer drugs; Most anticancer drugs and antioxidant phytochemicals are lipophilic with low solubility
• Design of controlled release systems; the release of encapsulated active agent in a targeted, sustained, and controlled manner
• In vitro and in vivo studies. In vivo refers to when research or work is done with or within an entire, living organism. Examples can include studies in animal models or human clinical trials. In vitro is used to describe work that's performed outside of a living organism
• Characterization of nanocarriers with a different instruments such as Dynamic light scattering (DLS), scanning electron microscope (SEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), etc


Keywords: pH-responsive, vesicular system, anticancer drugs, liposome, noisome


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

07 June 2021 Abstract
05 October 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

07 June 2021 Abstract
05 October 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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