Research Topic

Cellular Oxygen/Oxidative Homeostasis and Immunological Response

About this Research Topic

One of the central and vital factors for maintaining adequate cellular function is keeping its oxygen/oxidative homeostasis.
This means, that living tissues depend on constant oxygen supply in order to keep mitochondrial function, and more exactly to have enough oxygen to be reduced in four electron-steps to water inside the breathing chain.
Since the number of oxygen molecules needed is regulated by the actual energy demands of the cell, there is a minimum of oxygen necessary to fulfill the reduction work.
This minimum may be very different in tissues, depending on the workload of the cells.
On the other hand, the four-step reduction of oxygen at complex IV comes along with the production of a certain number of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from incomplete reduction to water, which is counterbalanced by a number of different antioxidative pathways.
Thus, cellular oxygen/oxidative homeostasis may be outlined as a situation with adequate oxygen supply for the current metabolic demands with well-regulated anti-oxidative capacity, causing a physiologic level of redox signaling, which is necessary for proper cell function.
Disturbance of this balanced system may happen because of a number of factors: acute or chronic hypoxia, maybe due to inadequate oxygen supply even for basal cellular demands, or because of insufficient replenishment under high cellular workload during hard work.
Moreover, non-physiologic situations like hyperoxia, different forms of irradiation or chemicals are also known to lead to an increased intracellular production of ROS and thus may contribute to disturbance of the balanced system with up to now not completely understood consequences.
There is a discussion, that disturbances of the oxygen/oxidative homeostasis may induce even specific immunologic responses, which may have a relevant influence on the pathophysiology of a number of diseases.

This Research Topic focuses on the mechanisms helping to keep oxygen/oxidative homeostasis balanced with an emphasis on related immunologic responses.
A deeper knowledge of these mechanisms may help in further elucidating the pathophysiology of a number of diseases and give a chance for therapeutic options.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

One of the central and vital factors for maintaining adequate cellular function is keeping its oxygen/oxidative homeostasis.
This means, that living tissues depend on constant oxygen supply in order to keep mitochondrial function, and more exactly to have enough oxygen to be reduced in four electron-steps to water inside the breathing chain.
Since the number of oxygen molecules needed is regulated by the actual energy demands of the cell, there is a minimum of oxygen necessary to fulfill the reduction work.
This minimum may be very different in tissues, depending on the workload of the cells.
On the other hand, the four-step reduction of oxygen at complex IV comes along with the production of a certain number of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from incomplete reduction to water, which is counterbalanced by a number of different antioxidative pathways.
Thus, cellular oxygen/oxidative homeostasis may be outlined as a situation with adequate oxygen supply for the current metabolic demands with well-regulated anti-oxidative capacity, causing a physiologic level of redox signaling, which is necessary for proper cell function.
Disturbance of this balanced system may happen because of a number of factors: acute or chronic hypoxia, maybe due to inadequate oxygen supply even for basal cellular demands, or because of insufficient replenishment under high cellular workload during hard work.
Moreover, non-physiologic situations like hyperoxia, different forms of irradiation or chemicals are also known to lead to an increased intracellular production of ROS and thus may contribute to disturbance of the balanced system with up to now not completely understood consequences.
There is a discussion, that disturbances of the oxygen/oxidative homeostasis may induce even specific immunologic responses, which may have a relevant influence on the pathophysiology of a number of diseases.

This Research Topic focuses on the mechanisms helping to keep oxygen/oxidative homeostasis balanced with an emphasis on related immunologic responses.
A deeper knowledge of these mechanisms may help in further elucidating the pathophysiology of a number of diseases and give a chance for therapeutic options.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

30 June 2021 Abstract
31 October 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

30 June 2021 Abstract
31 October 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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