Research Topic

CSR, SRI and Corporate Sustainability: An Accounting and Finance Perspective

About this Research Topic

Socially/sustainable responsible investment (SRI) research, within CSR, has been growing quickly in the last two decades, at the same time there has been a parallel increase in sustainability disclosures. Such disclosures should serve as guidelines to improve the integrated reporting quality and thereby to ensure a better allocation of resources in the economy. Indeed, capital providers’ concerns about social and environmental risks suggest that sustainability information affects financing arrangements. Sustainable accounting and finance research should consider that CSR is integrated through a holistic approach which is based on the interrelations between environment, social, and economic dimensions. Yet, there has been little explicit academic debate on how temporal dynamics play in such a multidimensional approach in which the different interactions should be considered both in the present and in the near and far future. Such dynamic view of CSR is extremely relevant to current trends of finance and ac-counting research which has long emphasized the economic value of SRI, as intangible, without actually analyzing it within a comprehensive sustainable framework. Many questions arise when finance and accounting issues are brought into relation with a holistic CSR approach: Is non-financial reporting as useful as it is claimed to be in the empirical disclosure literature? How is the quality of this information assessed within the dynamic CSR approach, by probably taking into consideration additional factors, such as the risks associated with changes in sustainable regulations or the impacts both on business and on people and the environment? How does CSR disclosure quality inform SRI and the allocated funds? Are business reputation and ethics relevant channels for sustainability disclosures and sustainable finance?

This Research Topic strives to contribute to the debate on the corporate commitment to SRI. It will address many questions related to sustainability disclosures and sustainable finance in the current context of multiple economic, environmental, and social controversies. It will draw from the most relevant theories underpinning the accounting and finance research such as the agency theory, signaling theory, proprietary costs theory, legitimacy theory, resource-dependency theory, and political costs theory. The Research Topic will offer additional insights into the understanding of the quid pro quo between non-financial reporting, financing, and investment decisions. It will also advance the knowledge on the importance of temporal dynamics in the transition from the pure economic view of the firm to a more global view that additionally involves sustainability dimensions. The papers included in this collection will address different determinants, factors, consequences, and implications of sustainability disclosures and sustainable finance considering a large variety of local and transnational frameworks, guidelines, initiatives, regulations, and taxonomies related to sustainable development, the environment, climate change, and human rights. The papers are intended to make significant contributions to existing literature on CSR, corporate disclosures, financial and non-financial reporting, SRI, and sustainable finance. They will also help draw policy implications that interest practitioners and policymakers.

The Research Topic welcomes contributions from research fields related to CSR, SRI, econom-ics, accounting, management, finance, and organisation theory. Topics of interest include but are not limited to the following:

• Quality of non-financial reporting;
• Value-relevance and informativeness of sustainability disclosures;
• Sustainability information and financial markets;
• CSR, CSR performance and sustainability reporting;
• Sustainability reporting, firm value and value creation;
• Non-financial reporting and external evaluation;
• Innovation in SRI and sustainability information;
• SRI and corporate sustainability in press releases and news;
• Compliance of non-financial reporting with national and transnational sustainable initiatives, regulations, frameworks, taxonomies, and guidelines;
• Green accounting and sustainable accounting standards;
• Green accounting management;
• SRI efficiency ;
• Sustainable finance, green finance, green bonds; climate change bonds, transition bonds;
• Sustainability finance, firm value and performance;
• Sustainability disclosures, SRI, and corporate governance;
• Sustainability strategy and sustainability reporting;
• Sustainability information, stakeholders, and institutions;
• Sustainability information, supply chains and management;
• CSR, SRI, and business ethics.


Keywords: Green Economy, Green Finance, Sustainable Finance, Corporate Policies, Sustainability Reporting


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Socially/sustainable responsible investment (SRI) research, within CSR, has been growing quickly in the last two decades, at the same time there has been a parallel increase in sustainability disclosures. Such disclosures should serve as guidelines to improve the integrated reporting quality and thereby to ensure a better allocation of resources in the economy. Indeed, capital providers’ concerns about social and environmental risks suggest that sustainability information affects financing arrangements. Sustainable accounting and finance research should consider that CSR is integrated through a holistic approach which is based on the interrelations between environment, social, and economic dimensions. Yet, there has been little explicit academic debate on how temporal dynamics play in such a multidimensional approach in which the different interactions should be considered both in the present and in the near and far future. Such dynamic view of CSR is extremely relevant to current trends of finance and ac-counting research which has long emphasized the economic value of SRI, as intangible, without actually analyzing it within a comprehensive sustainable framework. Many questions arise when finance and accounting issues are brought into relation with a holistic CSR approach: Is non-financial reporting as useful as it is claimed to be in the empirical disclosure literature? How is the quality of this information assessed within the dynamic CSR approach, by probably taking into consideration additional factors, such as the risks associated with changes in sustainable regulations or the impacts both on business and on people and the environment? How does CSR disclosure quality inform SRI and the allocated funds? Are business reputation and ethics relevant channels for sustainability disclosures and sustainable finance?

This Research Topic strives to contribute to the debate on the corporate commitment to SRI. It will address many questions related to sustainability disclosures and sustainable finance in the current context of multiple economic, environmental, and social controversies. It will draw from the most relevant theories underpinning the accounting and finance research such as the agency theory, signaling theory, proprietary costs theory, legitimacy theory, resource-dependency theory, and political costs theory. The Research Topic will offer additional insights into the understanding of the quid pro quo between non-financial reporting, financing, and investment decisions. It will also advance the knowledge on the importance of temporal dynamics in the transition from the pure economic view of the firm to a more global view that additionally involves sustainability dimensions. The papers included in this collection will address different determinants, factors, consequences, and implications of sustainability disclosures and sustainable finance considering a large variety of local and transnational frameworks, guidelines, initiatives, regulations, and taxonomies related to sustainable development, the environment, climate change, and human rights. The papers are intended to make significant contributions to existing literature on CSR, corporate disclosures, financial and non-financial reporting, SRI, and sustainable finance. They will also help draw policy implications that interest practitioners and policymakers.

The Research Topic welcomes contributions from research fields related to CSR, SRI, econom-ics, accounting, management, finance, and organisation theory. Topics of interest include but are not limited to the following:

• Quality of non-financial reporting;
• Value-relevance and informativeness of sustainability disclosures;
• Sustainability information and financial markets;
• CSR, CSR performance and sustainability reporting;
• Sustainability reporting, firm value and value creation;
• Non-financial reporting and external evaluation;
• Innovation in SRI and sustainability information;
• SRI and corporate sustainability in press releases and news;
• Compliance of non-financial reporting with national and transnational sustainable initiatives, regulations, frameworks, taxonomies, and guidelines;
• Green accounting and sustainable accounting standards;
• Green accounting management;
• SRI efficiency ;
• Sustainable finance, green finance, green bonds; climate change bonds, transition bonds;
• Sustainability finance, firm value and performance;
• Sustainability disclosures, SRI, and corporate governance;
• Sustainability strategy and sustainability reporting;
• Sustainability information, stakeholders, and institutions;
• Sustainability information, supply chains and management;
• CSR, SRI, and business ethics.


Keywords: Green Economy, Green Finance, Sustainable Finance, Corporate Policies, Sustainability Reporting


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

16 January 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

16 January 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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