Research Topic

Urbanization of Tropical Diseases

About this Research Topic

Tropical Medicine is no longer a clinical specialty of “exotic diseases”, as it was conceived at its beginnings, and is no longer “diseases for those that enter into the jungle”. One dramatic change is the urban installation of diseases that before were observed only after sylvatic or primary forest exposure. The increase of urban outbreaks of Chagas disease in South America is now a rampaged reality in Brazil, Venezuela, and Colombia and it is also a new reality for visceral leishmaniasis. The climatic change is producing dramatic changes in the frequency of insect and mammals that are definitive or intermediate hosts of many important tropical diseases. This changed the epidemiology of these diseases that are adapted to the conditions of cities, where now most of the world human population is living. All theses factors are creating conditions for the "perfect storm" that will increase the frequency of tropical diseases in urban settings. The integrated work of public health and veterinary specialists, entomologists, microbiologists and parasitologists to undertake public health measures for its prevention, control and mitigation is an urgent need.

This research topic is open to contributions describing the conditions and epidemiological factors linked to the presence of tropical diseases by viral, bacterial, parasite or mycotic infectious agents. Original works, systematic or expert narrative reviews are welcomed. Papers can deal with the modelling, clinical and epidemiological descriptions of urban outbreaks and analysis of vector or zoonotic contributions and its control.

This research topic is open to researchers working on the challenges facing this new reality to report the factors responsible for the adaptation of vectors and pathogens to urban transmission and propagation and measures that can and should be taken.


Keywords: climatic change, modelling of infectious diseases, vector, yellow fever, visceral leishmaniasis, chagas disease, dengue, toxocariasis, toxoplasmosis, zoonosis


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Tropical Medicine is no longer a clinical specialty of “exotic diseases”, as it was conceived at its beginnings, and is no longer “diseases for those that enter into the jungle”. One dramatic change is the urban installation of diseases that before were observed only after sylvatic or primary forest exposure. The increase of urban outbreaks of Chagas disease in South America is now a rampaged reality in Brazil, Venezuela, and Colombia and it is also a new reality for visceral leishmaniasis. The climatic change is producing dramatic changes in the frequency of insect and mammals that are definitive or intermediate hosts of many important tropical diseases. This changed the epidemiology of these diseases that are adapted to the conditions of cities, where now most of the world human population is living. All theses factors are creating conditions for the "perfect storm" that will increase the frequency of tropical diseases in urban settings. The integrated work of public health and veterinary specialists, entomologists, microbiologists and parasitologists to undertake public health measures for its prevention, control and mitigation is an urgent need.

This research topic is open to contributions describing the conditions and epidemiological factors linked to the presence of tropical diseases by viral, bacterial, parasite or mycotic infectious agents. Original works, systematic or expert narrative reviews are welcomed. Papers can deal with the modelling, clinical and epidemiological descriptions of urban outbreaks and analysis of vector or zoonotic contributions and its control.

This research topic is open to researchers working on the challenges facing this new reality to report the factors responsible for the adaptation of vectors and pathogens to urban transmission and propagation and measures that can and should be taken.


Keywords: climatic change, modelling of infectious diseases, vector, yellow fever, visceral leishmaniasis, chagas disease, dengue, toxocariasis, toxoplasmosis, zoonosis


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

20 June 2021 Abstract
18 October 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

20 June 2021 Abstract
18 October 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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