Research Topic

Hybrid or Mixed Myelodyplastic / Myeloproliferative Disorders: Current Trends in Diagnosis and Treatment

About this Research Topic

Myelodysplastic disorders are a diverse group of cancers resulting from erroneous haematopoiesis, ultimately causing blast cells to develop incorrectly and potentially cause an array of different syndromes. These groups of cancers tend to affect elderly patients and is hypothesised to be associated with the ageing process. Its inclusion in as a tracked group of malignancies in cancer registries only begun in 2001 in the USA, and its exact incidence is difficult to determine due to repeated re-classification of disease; however, its incidence is projected to grow, and will undoubtedly be compounded by a generally ageing population.

Myeloproliferative disorders are similarly related to the haematopoiesis process; however, in this case, there is an overproduction of blood cells in the bone marrow, which can result in the formation of a neoplasm. Like MDS, there are a number of specific cancers that fall under the category of myeloproliferative disorders. Similarly, myeloproliferative disorders underwent a re-classification in 2008, and now encompasses certain leukemias.

The Hybrid or Mixed Myelodysplastic / Myeloproliferative syndromes is a relatively new group of clonal hematopoietic stem-cell disorders, initially recognized and presented as separate entities in the WHO-2000 classification of hematologic neoplasms, but since then this classification has been revised repeatedly with the recognition of new entities and the slpit of Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, initially in the Dysplastic and the Proliferative subtype and later in two other subgroups CMML-1 and CMML-2 according to the percentage of BM blasts. Thus, this is an evolving group of clinical entities and treatment options are still restricted, and among them only allogeneic SCT retains a curative potential, In view of the above it would deserve to have an issue of a highly-rated journal, dedicated to the up to date description of the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges related to this group of disorders and the goal of this issue should be to become a reference tool for many years, for all the scientists and reseaches aho are interested of work by any means in this scientific field.

This special issue of Frontiers in Oncology aims to describe at a state of the art level the current knowledge on the epidemiology, classification, clinical features, pathogenesis and pathophysiology, diagnostic approach, prognosis and treatment of all the entities included in the field of Hybrid or Mixed Myelodysplastic / Myeloproliferative syndromes or neoplasms, in the form of comprehensive reviews, so that the whole journal issue will become a useful reference tool for all scientists, working in this field, either basic scientists or clinicians. It should include all the relevant informative references, which should be reviewed and critically presented and analyzed.


Keywords: Myelodysplastic syndromes, Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative disorders, Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, Molecular Pathophysiology, Supportive Treatment, Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, Novel targeting treatments


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Myelodysplastic disorders are a diverse group of cancers resulting from erroneous haematopoiesis, ultimately causing blast cells to develop incorrectly and potentially cause an array of different syndromes. These groups of cancers tend to affect elderly patients and is hypothesised to be associated with the ageing process. Its inclusion in as a tracked group of malignancies in cancer registries only begun in 2001 in the USA, and its exact incidence is difficult to determine due to repeated re-classification of disease; however, its incidence is projected to grow, and will undoubtedly be compounded by a generally ageing population.

Myeloproliferative disorders are similarly related to the haematopoiesis process; however, in this case, there is an overproduction of blood cells in the bone marrow, which can result in the formation of a neoplasm. Like MDS, there are a number of specific cancers that fall under the category of myeloproliferative disorders. Similarly, myeloproliferative disorders underwent a re-classification in 2008, and now encompasses certain leukemias.

The Hybrid or Mixed Myelodysplastic / Myeloproliferative syndromes is a relatively new group of clonal hematopoietic stem-cell disorders, initially recognized and presented as separate entities in the WHO-2000 classification of hematologic neoplasms, but since then this classification has been revised repeatedly with the recognition of new entities and the slpit of Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, initially in the Dysplastic and the Proliferative subtype and later in two other subgroups CMML-1 and CMML-2 according to the percentage of BM blasts. Thus, this is an evolving group of clinical entities and treatment options are still restricted, and among them only allogeneic SCT retains a curative potential, In view of the above it would deserve to have an issue of a highly-rated journal, dedicated to the up to date description of the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges related to this group of disorders and the goal of this issue should be to become a reference tool for many years, for all the scientists and reseaches aho are interested of work by any means in this scientific field.

This special issue of Frontiers in Oncology aims to describe at a state of the art level the current knowledge on the epidemiology, classification, clinical features, pathogenesis and pathophysiology, diagnostic approach, prognosis and treatment of all the entities included in the field of Hybrid or Mixed Myelodysplastic / Myeloproliferative syndromes or neoplasms, in the form of comprehensive reviews, so that the whole journal issue will become a useful reference tool for all scientists, working in this field, either basic scientists or clinicians. It should include all the relevant informative references, which should be reviewed and critically presented and analyzed.


Keywords: Myelodysplastic syndromes, Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative disorders, Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, Molecular Pathophysiology, Supportive Treatment, Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, Novel targeting treatments


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

27 June 2021 Abstract
25 October 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

27 June 2021 Abstract
25 October 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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