Research Topic

Gaze Behavior in Closed, Self-Paced Tasks

About this Research Topic

Closed, self-paced tasks are performed in stable and predictable environments in which the performers decide when to initiate their movement. Such tasks are a part of many professional domains (e.g. police, military, aviation, sports). Most types of sports, for example, require the performance of closed, self-paced tasks (e.g., golf putting or swinging, shooting free throws in basketball, dart-throwing). To perform these tasks successfully, performers can use different techniques or strategies. One important strategy involves the performer’s gaze behavior. The purpose of this research topic is to examine the relationship between gaze behavior and the performance of closed, self-paced tasks – specifically, how optimal gaze behavior can contribute to the expert performance of such tasks.

In this research topic, our goal is to provide readers with theoretical and practical implications of the relationship between gaze behavior and expert performance. Here we aim to address some critical open questions considering the role of gaze behavior for optimal performance in daily life and in different professional settings. For example: (1) Do we have good theoretical explanations for the relationships between gaze and performance?; (2) Can we clearly describe the “optimal” gaze behavior for specific tasks?; (3) What evidence-based practical suggestions can we give to coaches/instructors/teachers regarding gaze behavior and performance?; (4) What is the ecological validity of the knowledge we have so far on this topic?; (5) What are the neural correlates of gaze behavior and performance?; and (6) How does gaze behavior fit into ecological psychology?.

We are setting a broad scope for this research topic and are looking for articles from various domains.
Researchers are welcome to send original research, systematic reviews, narrative or mini reviews, theoretical papers, case reports, and/or brief research reports. Studies that address gaze behavior in relation to neural activity are welcome. Studies that examine gaze behavior in virtual reality environments, or that describe methods of conducting gaze research in virtual reality in a way that improves the ecological validity of the research, are also welcome.


Keywords: quiet eye, gaze behavior, motor learning, sport performance, expert performance


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Closed, self-paced tasks are performed in stable and predictable environments in which the performers decide when to initiate their movement. Such tasks are a part of many professional domains (e.g. police, military, aviation, sports). Most types of sports, for example, require the performance of closed, self-paced tasks (e.g., golf putting or swinging, shooting free throws in basketball, dart-throwing). To perform these tasks successfully, performers can use different techniques or strategies. One important strategy involves the performer’s gaze behavior. The purpose of this research topic is to examine the relationship between gaze behavior and the performance of closed, self-paced tasks – specifically, how optimal gaze behavior can contribute to the expert performance of such tasks.

In this research topic, our goal is to provide readers with theoretical and practical implications of the relationship between gaze behavior and expert performance. Here we aim to address some critical open questions considering the role of gaze behavior for optimal performance in daily life and in different professional settings. For example: (1) Do we have good theoretical explanations for the relationships between gaze and performance?; (2) Can we clearly describe the “optimal” gaze behavior for specific tasks?; (3) What evidence-based practical suggestions can we give to coaches/instructors/teachers regarding gaze behavior and performance?; (4) What is the ecological validity of the knowledge we have so far on this topic?; (5) What are the neural correlates of gaze behavior and performance?; and (6) How does gaze behavior fit into ecological psychology?.

We are setting a broad scope for this research topic and are looking for articles from various domains.
Researchers are welcome to send original research, systematic reviews, narrative or mini reviews, theoretical papers, case reports, and/or brief research reports. Studies that address gaze behavior in relation to neural activity are welcome. Studies that examine gaze behavior in virtual reality environments, or that describe methods of conducting gaze research in virtual reality in a way that improves the ecological validity of the research, are also welcome.


Keywords: quiet eye, gaze behavior, motor learning, sport performance, expert performance


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

27 July 2021 Abstract
24 November 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

27 July 2021 Abstract
24 November 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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