Research Topic

Coagulation Complications in Pediatric Oncology

About this Research Topic

The past two decades has seen an increase in coagulation complications occurring in children. Although overall rare, several factors push this growth, including increasing survival with a chronic condition, use of catheters, and use of new diagnostic tools. Specifically, pediatric oncology patients are at a high risk due to disease and treatment (e.g., chemotherapy). Severe hemorrhage, manifesting as disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, is a primary cause of mortality in acute leukemia and solid tumors. Deep vein thrombosis is significantly associated with acute leukemia with an incidence ranging from 3 to 14%. Despite this rise, little research exists on the mechanisms, risk factors, and treatment of coagulation complications that occur before, during, and after pediatric malignancy.

A growing problem in pediatric oncology is the diagnosis and management of hemorrhage and thrombotic complications. Previous work in adult oncology has led to large clinical trials that used direct oral anticoagulants to decrease thrombotic complications. Our hope is that increased recognition of this Research Topic will lead to improved pediatric risk identification, diagnosis, and management of coagulation complications in children oncology. Therefore, our goal is to collect and publish original journal articles, reviews, and editorials that address the diagnosis and treatment of coagulation complications in children with a hematological or non-hematological malignancy.

This Research Topic will provide current information about coagulation complications that occur before, during, and after pediatric malignancy to oncologists as well as practicing pediatricians and other providers caring for children who are survivors or in active treatment for malignancy. Topics on epidemiology, basic, translational, and clinical research are welcome. Types of articles can include original research articles, reviews of the current literature, or surveys on trends in diagnosis or management. The goal of this article collection is to improve understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of life-threatening coagulation complications that result from pediatric oncology disease or treatment.


Keywords: Thrombosis, Pediatrics, Chemotherapy/Toxicity, Thrombophillia, Cancer Survivor


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The past two decades has seen an increase in coagulation complications occurring in children. Although overall rare, several factors push this growth, including increasing survival with a chronic condition, use of catheters, and use of new diagnostic tools. Specifically, pediatric oncology patients are at a high risk due to disease and treatment (e.g., chemotherapy). Severe hemorrhage, manifesting as disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, is a primary cause of mortality in acute leukemia and solid tumors. Deep vein thrombosis is significantly associated with acute leukemia with an incidence ranging from 3 to 14%. Despite this rise, little research exists on the mechanisms, risk factors, and treatment of coagulation complications that occur before, during, and after pediatric malignancy.

A growing problem in pediatric oncology is the diagnosis and management of hemorrhage and thrombotic complications. Previous work in adult oncology has led to large clinical trials that used direct oral anticoagulants to decrease thrombotic complications. Our hope is that increased recognition of this Research Topic will lead to improved pediatric risk identification, diagnosis, and management of coagulation complications in children oncology. Therefore, our goal is to collect and publish original journal articles, reviews, and editorials that address the diagnosis and treatment of coagulation complications in children with a hematological or non-hematological malignancy.

This Research Topic will provide current information about coagulation complications that occur before, during, and after pediatric malignancy to oncologists as well as practicing pediatricians and other providers caring for children who are survivors or in active treatment for malignancy. Topics on epidemiology, basic, translational, and clinical research are welcome. Types of articles can include original research articles, reviews of the current literature, or surveys on trends in diagnosis or management. The goal of this article collection is to improve understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of life-threatening coagulation complications that result from pediatric oncology disease or treatment.


Keywords: Thrombosis, Pediatrics, Chemotherapy/Toxicity, Thrombophillia, Cancer Survivor


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

31 January 2022 Abstract
30 June 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

31 January 2022 Abstract
30 June 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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