Research Topic

Eco-friendly Consumption of Fibers in Construction Materials

About this Research Topic

Fiber-reinforced concrete (FRC) and other fiber-reinforced construction materials (FRCM) are becoming popular in several civil engineering applications (storage tanks, pavements, tunnels, hydraulic structures, etc.) due to their high fracture toughness, tensile strength and good durability in harsh environments. The FRC and other FRCM achieve their proprieties of the use of different industrial fibers i.e., steel, glass, polypropylene, etc. Although, many of the issues of conventional materials have been resolved, but these solutions are expensive and have high carbon footprint. Moreover, the addition of fibers to the construction materials such as paste, mortar and concrete create workability issues which increases the requirement of plasticizers to compensate for the loss of workability. The use of energy-intensive fibers and costly plasticizers raises concerns over the usage of fiber in construction materials.

Fiber-reinforced concrete (FRC) is becoming popular due to its higher tensile strength, fatigue and fracture resistance compared to conventional plain concrete (PC). Normally, PC is reinforced with industrially manufactured fibers, in order to produce FRC. Conventional fibers, such as steel, polypropylene and glass fibers are expensive and are not easily available especially in developing regions. Due to energy-intensive process and high transportation costs, conventional fiber-reinforcements can enhance the carbon footprint of the final concrete product. In addition to that, the use of plasticizers to resolve the workability issues makes the FRC production expensive. Therefore, it is essential to look for eco-friendly and cheap solutions to resolve the problems of FRC.

Sustainable development of fiber-reinforced concrete (FRC) and other fiber-reinforced construction materials (FRCM) is never possible without considering the eco-friendly use of fibers. Unlike industrially manufactured fibers which possess very high carbon footprint, organic fibers and waste fibers possess very small footprint. Therefore, to resolve environmental economical challenges, FRC and other FRCM should be investigated with organic and waste fibers. Furthermore, we can resolve the sustainability issues of FRC and other FRCM by promoting the usage of waste-binding materials and recycled aggregates in conjunction with industrial and/or waste fibers.

This Research Topic is devoted to the publication of new research papers related to sustainable development of fiber-reinforced concrete. Following themes are included in this Research Topic:

• Improved design of fiber-reinforced concrete or any other construction materials such as paste and mortar
• Organic fiber-reinforced concrete
• Waste fiber-reinforced concrete
• Fiber-reinforced concrete with recycled aggregates
• Fiber-reinforced concrete with waste mineral admixtures (fly ash, silica fume, slag, etc.)
• Life cycle assessment of fiber-reinforced concrete with new and waste fibers

Babar Ali has acted in an advisory capacity and contributed to the development of this collection.


Keywords: plant fibers, waste fibers, durability, sustainability, life cycle assessment, carbon footprint


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Fiber-reinforced concrete (FRC) and other fiber-reinforced construction materials (FRCM) are becoming popular in several civil engineering applications (storage tanks, pavements, tunnels, hydraulic structures, etc.) due to their high fracture toughness, tensile strength and good durability in harsh environments. The FRC and other FRCM achieve their proprieties of the use of different industrial fibers i.e., steel, glass, polypropylene, etc. Although, many of the issues of conventional materials have been resolved, but these solutions are expensive and have high carbon footprint. Moreover, the addition of fibers to the construction materials such as paste, mortar and concrete create workability issues which increases the requirement of plasticizers to compensate for the loss of workability. The use of energy-intensive fibers and costly plasticizers raises concerns over the usage of fiber in construction materials.

Fiber-reinforced concrete (FRC) is becoming popular due to its higher tensile strength, fatigue and fracture resistance compared to conventional plain concrete (PC). Normally, PC is reinforced with industrially manufactured fibers, in order to produce FRC. Conventional fibers, such as steel, polypropylene and glass fibers are expensive and are not easily available especially in developing regions. Due to energy-intensive process and high transportation costs, conventional fiber-reinforcements can enhance the carbon footprint of the final concrete product. In addition to that, the use of plasticizers to resolve the workability issues makes the FRC production expensive. Therefore, it is essential to look for eco-friendly and cheap solutions to resolve the problems of FRC.

Sustainable development of fiber-reinforced concrete (FRC) and other fiber-reinforced construction materials (FRCM) is never possible without considering the eco-friendly use of fibers. Unlike industrially manufactured fibers which possess very high carbon footprint, organic fibers and waste fibers possess very small footprint. Therefore, to resolve environmental economical challenges, FRC and other FRCM should be investigated with organic and waste fibers. Furthermore, we can resolve the sustainability issues of FRC and other FRCM by promoting the usage of waste-binding materials and recycled aggregates in conjunction with industrial and/or waste fibers.

This Research Topic is devoted to the publication of new research papers related to sustainable development of fiber-reinforced concrete. Following themes are included in this Research Topic:

• Improved design of fiber-reinforced concrete or any other construction materials such as paste and mortar
• Organic fiber-reinforced concrete
• Waste fiber-reinforced concrete
• Fiber-reinforced concrete with recycled aggregates
• Fiber-reinforced concrete with waste mineral admixtures (fly ash, silica fume, slag, etc.)
• Life cycle assessment of fiber-reinforced concrete with new and waste fibers

Babar Ali has acted in an advisory capacity and contributed to the development of this collection.


Keywords: plant fibers, waste fibers, durability, sustainability, life cycle assessment, carbon footprint


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

30 September 2021 Abstract
28 February 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

30 September 2021 Abstract
28 February 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..