Research Topic

Macromolecular and Supramolecular Colloids for Biomedical Applications

About this Research Topic

Macromolecular and supramolecular colloids include soft particles and hydrogels fabricated by natural and synthetic small molecules or macromolecules. They are promising platforms to serve as implant materials or deliver imaging agents and therapeutics for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases. These colloidal materials are generally required to have excellent biocompatibility, controllable degradability, and tunable physicochemical properties that are critical for accurate disease diagnosis, targeted therapeutic delivery, controlled drug release, and safe disease treatment. In addition to the study of the biomedical applications of these materials, the fundamental investigation on precise control of the properties of the macromolecular and supramolecular colloids and composites is also highly important in this field since the properties seriously affect the functions and applications of these materials.

The goal of this Research Topic is to provide a good platform for sharing the new concepts, experimental data, fundamental investigation, application examples, and theoretical results with the international researchers who are working on the development of novel polymers, composites, supramolecular materials, and biomaterials. This topic will have a particular interest but not limited to the recent advances in polymer synthesis, molecular self-assembly, and biomaterial fabrication, as well as in different biomedical applications of the macromolecular and supramolecular colloids and composites, such as disease diagnosis, drug delivery, tissue engineering, and disease treatments.

This Research Topic welcomes submissions of Original Research, Mini-Review, Review, and Perspective articles from all over the world. Areas of interest include, but are not limited to:

• Synthesis and application of biocompatible, degradable, recyclable, and/or reactive polymers
• Synthesis of supramolecular polymers
• Dissipative self-assembly for the construction of transient colloidal materials
• Biomaterial fabrication for the applications of disease diagnosis, drug delivery, and/or tissue engineering
• Colloid self-assembly for medical applications
• Gels with special wettability


Keywords: Polymers, Supramolecular Interactions, Colloids, Gels, Biomaterials


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Macromolecular and supramolecular colloids include soft particles and hydrogels fabricated by natural and synthetic small molecules or macromolecules. They are promising platforms to serve as implant materials or deliver imaging agents and therapeutics for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases. These colloidal materials are generally required to have excellent biocompatibility, controllable degradability, and tunable physicochemical properties that are critical for accurate disease diagnosis, targeted therapeutic delivery, controlled drug release, and safe disease treatment. In addition to the study of the biomedical applications of these materials, the fundamental investigation on precise control of the properties of the macromolecular and supramolecular colloids and composites is also highly important in this field since the properties seriously affect the functions and applications of these materials.

The goal of this Research Topic is to provide a good platform for sharing the new concepts, experimental data, fundamental investigation, application examples, and theoretical results with the international researchers who are working on the development of novel polymers, composites, supramolecular materials, and biomaterials. This topic will have a particular interest but not limited to the recent advances in polymer synthesis, molecular self-assembly, and biomaterial fabrication, as well as in different biomedical applications of the macromolecular and supramolecular colloids and composites, such as disease diagnosis, drug delivery, tissue engineering, and disease treatments.

This Research Topic welcomes submissions of Original Research, Mini-Review, Review, and Perspective articles from all over the world. Areas of interest include, but are not limited to:

• Synthesis and application of biocompatible, degradable, recyclable, and/or reactive polymers
• Synthesis of supramolecular polymers
• Dissipative self-assembly for the construction of transient colloidal materials
• Biomaterial fabrication for the applications of disease diagnosis, drug delivery, and/or tissue engineering
• Colloid self-assembly for medical applications
• Gels with special wettability


Keywords: Polymers, Supramolecular Interactions, Colloids, Gels, Biomaterials


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

11 December 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

11 December 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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